Retention of Technology-Based Interactives

The Cleveland Museum of Art’s Gallery One blends art, technology, and interpretation.  It includes real works from the museum’s collection as well as interactive, technology-based activities and games.  For example, Global Influences presents visitors with an artwork and asks them to guess which two countries on the map influenced the work in question; and crowd favorite Strike a Pose asks visitors to imitate the pose of a sculpture and invites them to save and share the resulting photograph.

It’s really cool stuff.  But as the museum plans a refresh of the space, the archives and IT department are starting to contemplate how to preserve the history of Gallery One.  The interactives will have to go, monitors and other hardware will be repurposed, and new artwork and interactive experiences will be installed.  We need to decide what to retain in archives and figure out how to collect and preserve whatever we decide to keep.

These pending decisions bring up familiar archival questions and ask us to apply them to complex digital materials: what about this gallery installation has enduring value?  Is it enough to retain a record of the look and feel of the space, perhaps create videos of the interactives?  Is it necessary to retain and preserve all of the code?

Records retention schedules call for the permanent retention of gallery labels, exhibition photographs, and other exhibition records but do not specifically address technology-based interactives.  The museum is developing an institutional repository for digital preservation using Fedora, but we are still in the testing phases for relatively simple image collections and we aren’t ready to ingest complex materials like the interactives from Gallery One.

As we work through these issues I would be grateful for input from the archives community.  How do we go about this? Does anyone have experience with the retention and preservation technology-based interactives?

Susan Hernandez is the Digital Archivist and Systems Librarian at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Her responsibilities include accessioning and preserving the museum’s electronic records; overseeing library and archives databases and systems; developing library and archives digitization programs; and serving on the development team for the museum’s institutional repository. Leave a comment or contact her directly at shernandez@clevelandart.org.

Caption These Bits! #3

It’s time for Caption These Bits! round three! You’re digital pun experts now, right?

Once a month, bloggERS invites readers to submit captions for images related to electronic records and the history of technology, sourced from archives around the world. Submit your caption below by 6/19. Digital archives, preservation, and curation humor encouraged.

We’ll choose three finalists and invite readers to vote for the winner.

Now that we’ve all mastered our born-digital workflows with last week’s blog post, we’re ready to tackle some light computer maintenance. So here’s this month’s image:

BostonPublicLibrary-11_07_003861Source: Grant, Spencer.  11_07_003861. 1978.  Boston Public Library via Digital Commonwealth,  http://ark.digitalcommonwealth.org/ark:/50959/sn00b1507

CAPTION THESE BITS!

It May Work In Theory . . . Getting Down to Earth with Digital Workflows

Recently, Joe Coen, archivist at the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn, posted this to the ERS listserv:

I’m looking to find out what workflows you have for ingest of electronic records and what tools you are using for doing checksums, creating a wrapper for the files and metadata, etc. We will be taking in electronic and paper records from a closed high school next month and l want to do as much as l can according to best practices.

I’d appreciate any advice and suggestions you can give.
51069522_fa3dd37b07_z
“OK. I’ve connected the Fedora-BagIt-Library-Sleuthkit to the FTK-Bitcurator-Archivematica instance using the Kryoflux-Writeblocker-Labelmaker . . . now what?” (photo by e-magic, https://www.flickr.com/photos/emagic/51069522/).
Joe said a couple of people responded to his question directly, but that means we’ve missed an opportunity to learn as a community of archivists working with digital materials about the actual practices of other archivists working with digital materials.

There are a lot of different archivists working with electronic records—some are administrators, some are temps, some are lone arrangers, some are programmers, some are born digital archivists and some have digital archivy thrust upon them—and this diversity of interests and viewpoints is, to my mind, an untapped resource.

There are so many helpful articles and white papers out there offering general guidance and warning of common pitfalls, but sometimes, when you’re trying to cobble together an ingest workflow or planning a site visit, you just think, “Yeah, but how do I actually do this?”

Why don’t we do that here?

If you’ve got links to ingest workflows, transfer guidelines, in-house best practices, digital materials surveys, or any other formal or informal procedures that just might maybe, kinda, one day be helpful to another archivist, why not post or describe them in the comments?

I know I’ve often scoured the Internet for similar advice only to find it in a comment to a blog post.