Consortial Certification Processes: the Goportis Digital Archive—a Case Study

By Franziska Schwab, Yvonne Tunnat, and Dr. Thomas Gerdes

This post is the second post in our series on international perspectives on digital preservation.

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The Goportis Consortium consists of the three German National Subject Libraries: the TIB Hannover, ZB MED Cologne/Bonn and the ZBW Kiel/Hamburg.

One key area of collaboration is digital preservation. We jointly use the Goportis Digital Archive based on Ex Libris’s Rosetta since 2010. The certification of our digital archive is part of our quality management, since all workflows are evaluated. Beyond that, a certification seal signals to external parties, like stakeholders and customers, that the long-term availability of the data is ensured, and the digital archive is trustworthy.

So far TIB and ZBW have successfully completed the certification processes for the Data Seal of Approval (DSA) and are currently working on the application for the nestor Seal. Here are some key facts about the seals:

Seal Since Extent Focus Certified institutions (01/2017)
Data Seal of Approval 2010 16 guidelines Ingest, Preservation, Access 64
nestor Seal 2014 34 criteria Ingest, Preservation, Access, Organization & Sustainability Aspects 2

Distribution of Tasks

In general, we are equal partners. For digital preservation, though, TIB is the consortium leader, since it is the software licensee and hosts the computing center.

Due to the terms of the DSA—as well as those of the nestor Seal—a consortium cannot be certified as a whole, but only each partner individually. For that reason each partner drew up its own application. However, for some aspects of the certification ZBW had to refer to the answers of TIB, which functions as its service provider.

Beside these external requirements, we organized the distribution of tasks on the basis of internal goals as well. We interpreted the certification process as an opportunity to get a deeper insight in the workflows, policies and dependencies of our partner institutions. That is why we analyzed the DSA guidelines together. Moreover, we discussed the progress of the application process regularly in telephone conferences and matched our answers to each guideline. As a positive side effect, this way of proceeding strengthened not only the ability of our teamwork, it also led to a better understanding of the guidelines and more elaborate answers for the DSA application.

The documentations for the DSA were created in more detail than recommended in order to facilitate further use of the documents for the nestor Seal.

Time Frame

The certification process for the DSA extended over six months (12/2014–08/2015).  In each institution one employee was in charge of the certification process. Other staff members added special information about their respective areas of work. This included technical development, data specialists, legal professionals, team leaders, and system administration (TIB only). The costs of applying for the seal can be measured in person months:

Institution Person Responsible Other Staff Total
TIB ~ 3 ~ 0.25 ~ 3.25
ZBW ~ 1.5 ~ 0.1 ~ 1.6

Outlook: nestor Seal

The nestor Seal represents the second level of the European Framework for Audit and Certification of Digital Repositories. With its 34 criteria, it is more complex than the DSA. It also requires more detailed information, which makes it necessary to involve more staff from different departments. The time effort is not foreseeable at this time.

map5
Map with relationships between the nestor criteria (Click on the image to enlarge it.) (Read more.)

 

Based on our positive experiences with the DSA certification, we plan to acquire the nestor Seal following the same procedures. The DSA application has prepared the ground for this task, since important documents, such as policies, have already been drafted.

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Franziska Schwab is working as a Preservation Analyst in the Digital Preservation team at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB) since 2014. She’s responsible for Pre-Ingest data analysis, Ingest, process documentation, policies, and certification.

Yvonne Tunnat is the Digital Preservation Manager for the Leibniz Information Centre for Economics in Kiel/Hamburg (ZBW) since 2011. Her key working areas are format identification, validation, and preservation planning.

Dr. Thomas Gerdes is part of the Digital Preservation team of the Leibniz Information Centre for Economics in Kiel/Hamburg (ZBW), since 2015. His interests are in the field of certification methods.

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