Meet the 2018 Candidates: Scott Kirycki

The 2018 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! To support your getting to know the candidates, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2018 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2018 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open through July 17!

Candidate name: Scott Kirycki

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

My journey to becoming an archivist began somewhere that did not, strictly speaking, exist: the fictional worlds of radio programs from the 1940s. When I was a boy, a local radio station replayed old shows such as The Lone Ranger, The Shadow, and The Jack Benny Program. The shows pulled me in with their appeal to the imagination, and I wanted to learn more about them. My parents and teachers had taught me well about the library, and my interest in radio programs (and soon my interest in the historical period that produced them) provided a new focus for the use of library resources. I checked out books, records, and tapes and studied the non-circulating reference material. Later, as I worked on more research projects for school assignments, I learned how to use The Reader’s Guide to Periodical Literature, and that led me to the treasures contained in bound volumes of magazines and on microfilm.

After starting college and choosing English as my major, I spent more time in libraries, particularly academic libraries with their special collections and emphasis on research. I grew to enjoy the research part of college work especially, which prompted me to pursue a master’s in English literature. When the time came for me to do a thesis for my degree, I picked a bibliographic research project over a literary interpretation or analysis. I created an annotated bibliography of the books advertised in The Tatler, an eighteenth-century British periodical.

Given my interest in research and the amount of time I spent in libraries, I considered following my master’s in English with a degree in library science. Since I liked historical material, I thought of studying to work in an archive. Although I looked into applying at some schools of library science, I was not wholeheartedly enthusiastic about additional years of schooling at that point in my life, so my journey took a turn to the business world.

The company where I began working after grad school turned out to be a good fit for me. The work connected to my interest in research because it involved making computerized databases for lawyers. I learned about database software, indexing, document scanning, and some electronic records management. In time, I became a department manager and later moved to project management. Regrettably for me, the company was eventually sold, and the new owners started a course of restructuring that culminated with the elimination of my position.

After exploring the job market, I reached the conclusion that further education would be a rewarding pursuit – rewarding not just from the standpoint of increasing the likelihood of landing a job, but also rewarding for personal growth and the opportunity to learn from other people. Because I had considered library science before and still had an interest in the things of the past, I decided to return to school to earn a degree in library science with a focus on archives. I was drawn to courses on digital content where I could continue to use and build on the experience and data-handling skills that I gained during my first career.

Though my decision to become an archivist was a long time coming, I am glad to have made it and look forward to continuing to discover the rewards of working in a field where I can benefit others by helping them connect to information.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

As I have been working on projects with the Records Management Team at the University of Notre Dame, I have become increasingly aware of how many electronic records consist of data points in enterprise-size content management systems rather than discrete files such as Word docs and PDFs. I anticipate that archiving databases as well as material from systems that were not necessarily designed with long-term preservation in mind will be a growing challenge for archivists. I would like to see the Electronic Records Section put forward guidance on best practices for meeting this challenge.

What cartoon character do you model yourself after?

The Tick (from the 1994 – 1996 Fox animated series)

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Meet the 2018 Candidates: Kelsey O’Connell

The 2018 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! To support your getting to know the candidates, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2018 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2018 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open through July 17!

Candidate name: Kelsey O’Connell

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

As a history/English major in college, I knew I didn’t want to become a teacher or a lawyer so I began exploring other career options. I landed a position as a student assistant in my college library’s Special Collections and Archives department where I began processing collections. I immediately loved the organization, research, and learning that I participated in daily and realized I just wanted to do this for the rest of my life.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

My primary interest is employing ERS’s platform to influence SAA and related organizations to begin creating and formalizing documentation for electronic records. We all talk about documentation a lot, but we still haven’t rolled them out. I think a strategic approach to initiating much of this documentation is for ERS to survey, index, and prioritize various policies, guidelines, standards, and frameworks needed to have robust documentation on the management and care of electronic records. We’d be able to utilize Section members’ input and participation in the discussion, allowing us to have a comprehensive yet diverse perspective for our recommendations.

What cartoon character do you model yourself after?

I have to admit I had to ask my family and friends for help identifying this one. More than a few of them said Velma from Scooby Doo. I laughed because I assumed it was because I really can’t see without my glasses – like when my cat enjoys knocking them off my nightstand in the middle of the night and I have to search for them in the morning. But they all said it’s because I like figuring stuff out. Although mystery isn’t my favorite genre, there are some clear parallels to researching and employing some trial and error tactics with electronic records.

Meet the 2018 Candidates: Jane Kelly

The 2018 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! To support your getting to know the candidates, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2018 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2018 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open through July 17!

Candidate name: Jane Kelly

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

My first contact with archives was as a college intern. The position was unpaid, required an expensive ninety minute commute each way, and wasn’t exactly thrilling. I spent most of that job with my headphones in, dusting red rot off of books, waiting to go home. This was not my dream job. It wasn’t until several years after I finished college that I found myself truly engaged with archives as a career path. I studied history as an undergrad but chose not to pursue a PhD, so I was happy to find myself in a job where understanding the past really matters. I began to appreciate the ways in which archives and archivists construct narratives of the past in their everyday work. For better or worse, there’s a lot of power in what we do. More importantly, it was the people I worked with who made me want to become an archivist. Having coworkers who took the time to teach me on the job, especially before I started grad school, has been invaluable. Working with people who encouraged me to attend conferences, grapple with big questions, and take on responsibility made me want to keep working and learning. Without that, I’m not sure that I would have stuck around.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

I would love to see the Electronic Records Section become an even greater resource for other SAA sections. It seems inevitable that everyone who works in archives will need to understand electronic records and born-digital material, at least at a basic level. ERS seems like the obvious hub for those resources. I want other archivists to see that they are capable of understanding issues unique to electronic records and that they don’t need to be intimidated by this part of the field. As a young professional, I’m also particularly interested in partnering with SNAP. Access to mentorship has been really important for me, both in terms of choosing to stay in the archives profession and learning how to do the work. I would like to see deeper connections between these two groups and find ways to support folks who don’t have resources to pay for SAA courses to supplement what they learn in graduate school.

What cartoon character do you model yourself after?

This is a hard question. I’ll go with Eliza Thornberry because she’s a smart kid, and I also wish I could talk to my cat.

Meet the 2018 Candidates: Susan Malsbury

The 2018 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! To support your getting to know the candidates, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2018 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2018 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open through July 17!

Candidate name: Susan Malsbury

Running for: Vice-Chair / Chair-Elect

What made you want to become an archivist?

When I was initially applying to library schools, I wanted to be sure that I was choosing the right career path. To that end, I volunteered at the Portland Public Library and the Maine Historical Society, both in Portland, Maine. While I enjoyed my time at the public library, I immediately fell in love with the archival work at the historical society. My project there was helping an archivist process the Portland Press Herald glass plate negative collection and scan select negatives for inclusion in the Maine Memory Network. It was magic seeing all these early-20th century images unwrapped from their cracked, yellowed envelopes and reintroduced to the world after so many years via description and scanning. It was extremely fulfilling to help preserve the negatives for future researchers. I returned to New York City and was fortunate enough to get a job in the Manuscripts and Archives Division at the New York Public Library. I was able to supplement my graduate work with hands-on experience processing some truly incredible collections such as the 1939/1940 New York World’s Fair papers and the Truman Capote papers. While digital archives are a far cry from glass plate negatives, I feel a similar fulfillment knowing that I’m helping ensure the preservation and future accessibility of unique born-digital records.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

There are a lot of exciting initiatives, programs, and ad hoc groups developing in the digital archives and digital preservation communities. I would love for ERS to build on its mandate to be the locus of expertise for SAA by serving as a platform for these projects to reach SAA’s general membership. Additionally, I’d like to work to expand participation as an ever-greater number of archivists are working with born-digital material (even if “digital” isn’t in their job title).

What cartoon character do you model yourself after?

As a child of the ‘90s I’ve always strongly identified with Lisa Simpson.