Students Reflect (Part 1 of 2): Tech Skills In and Out of the Classroom

By London Stever, Hayley Wilson, and Adriana Casarez

This is the third post in the bloggERS Making Tech Skills a Strategic Priority series.

As part of our “Making Tech Skills a Strategic Priority” series, the bloggERS team asked five current and recent MLIS/MSIS students to reflect on how they have learned the technology skills necessary to tackle their careers after school. One major theme, as expressed by these three writers, is the need for a balance of learning inside and outside the classroom.

London Stever, 2018 graduate, University of Pittsburgh

Approaching the six-month anniversary of my MLIS graduation, I find myself reflecting on my technological growth. Going into graduate school, I expected little technology training. Naively, I believed that most archival jobs were paper-only, excepting occasional digitization projects. Imagine my surprise upon finding out the University of Pittsburgh required an introduction to HTML. This trend continued, as the university insisted students have balanced knowledge.

I took technology-focused courses ranging from a history of computers (useful for those expecting to work with older hardware) to an overview of open-source library repositories and learning management systems (not to be discounted by those going into academia). The most useful of these classes was the required digital humanities course. Since graduating, I have applied the practical introduction to ArchivesSpace and Archivematica – and the in-depth explanation of discoverability, access, and web crawling – to my current work at SAE International.

However, none of the information I learned in those classes would be helpful on its own. University did not prepare me for talking to the IT Department. Terminology used in archives and in IT often overlaps, but usage does not. Custom, in-house programs require troubleshooting, and university technology classes did not teach me those skills. Libraries and archives often need to work with software not specially designed for them, but the university did not address this.

Self-taught classes, YouTube videos, and outside certifications were the most useful technology education for me. Using these, I customized my education to meet the needs companies mention and my own learning needs, which focus on practical application I did not get in university. I understand troubleshooting, allowing me to use programs built fifteen years ago. Creating a blog or using a content services platform to increase discoverability and internal access is a breeze. In addition to the balanced digital to analog education of university, I also needed a balance of library and general technology education.

Hayley Wilson, current student, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

When registering for classes at UNC Chapel Hill prior to the Fall semester of 2017, I was informed that I was required to fulfill a technology competency requirement. I had the option to either take an at home test or take a technology course (for no credit). I decided to take the technology course because I assumed it would be beneficial to other classes I would be required to take as an MLS student.

As it turns out, as a library science student on the archives and records management track, I had a very strict set of courses I was required to take, with room for only two electives. None of these required courses were focused on technology or building technology skills. I have friends on the Information Science side of the program who are required to take numerous courses that have a strong focus on technology. Fortunately, while at SILS I have had numerous opportunities outside of the classroom to learn and build my technology skills through my various internships and graduate assistant positions. However, I don’t think that every student has the opportunity to do so in their jobs.

Adriana Cásarez, 2018 graduate, University of Texas at Austin

Entering my MSIS program with an interest in digital humanities, I expected my coursework would provide most of the expertise I needed to become a more tech-savvy researcher. Indeed, a survey course in digital humanities gave me an overview of digital tools and methodologies. Additionally, a more intense programming course for cultural data analysis taught me specialized coding for data analysis, machine learning and data visualization. The programming was challenging and using the command line was daunting, but I was fortunate to develop a network of motivated peers who also wanted to develop their technical aptitude.  

Sometimes, I felt I was learning just as many technical skills outside of my general coursework. The university library offered workshops on digital scholarship tools for the academic community. My technical skills and knowledge of trends in topics like text analysis, data curation, and metadata grew by attending as many as I could. The Digital Scholarship Librarian and I also organized co-working sessions for students working on digital scholarship projects. These sessions created a community of practice to share expertise, feedback, and support with others interested in developing their technical aptitude in a productive space. We discussed the successes and frustrations with our projects and with the technology that we were often independently teaching ourselves to use. These community meetups were invaluable avenues to learn from each other and further develop our technical capabilities.

With increased focus on digital archives, libraries and scholarship, students often feel expected to just know or to teach themselves technical skills independently. My experience in my MSIS program taught me that often others are in the same boat, experiencing similar frustrations but too embarrassed to ask for help or admit ignorance. Communities of practice are essential to create an environment where students felt comfortable discussing obstacles and developing technical skills together.


Stever-LondonLondon Stever is an archival consultant at SAE International, where she balances company culture with international and industry standards, including bridging the gap between IT and discovery partners. London graduated from the University of Pittsburgh’s MLIS – Archives program and is currently working on her CompTIA certifications. She values self-education and believes multilingualism and technological literacy are the keys to archival accessibility. Please email london.stever@outlook.com or go to londonstever.com to contact London.

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Hayley Wilson is originally from San Diego but moved to New York to attend New York University. She graduated from NYU with a BA in Art History and stayed in NYC to work for a couple of years before moving abroad to work. She then moved to North Carolina for graduate school and will be graduating in May with her master’s degree in Library Science with a concentration in Archives and Records Management.

casarez_headshotAdriana Cásarez is a recent MSIS graduate from the University of Texas at Austin. She has worked as a research assistant on a digital classics project for the Quantitative Criticism Lab. She also developed a digital collection of artistic depictions of the Aeneid using cultural heritage APIs. She aspires to work in digital scholarship and advocate for diversity and inclusivity in libraries.

One thought on “Students Reflect (Part 1 of 2): Tech Skills In and Out of the Classroom

  1. Mary Johnson February 7, 2019 / 9:00 am

    I’m surprised that any Library Science degree would not have a strong technology component these days, but it also makes me wonder if all the real world requirements call for more courses (including hands-on work with electronic records) to get a degree.

    Like

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