Assessing the Digital Forensics Instruction Landscape with BitCuratorEdu

by Jess Farrell

This is the sixth post in the bloggERS Making Tech Skills a Strategic Priority series.

Over the past couple of months, we’ve heard a lot on bloggERS about how current students, recent grads, and mid-career professionals have made tech skills a strategic priority in their development plans. I like to think about the problem of “gaining tech skills” as being similar to “saving the environment”: individual action is needed and necessary, but it is most effective when it feeds clearly into systemic action.

So that begs the question, what root changes might educators of all types suggest and support to help GLAM professionals prioritize tech skills development? What are educator communities and systems – iSchools, faculty, and continuing education instructors – doing to achieve this? These questions are among those addressed by the BitCuratorEdu research project.

The BitCuratorEdu project is a two three-year effort funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to study and advance the adoption of born-digital archiving and digital forensics tools and methods in libraries and archives through a range of professional education efforts. The project is a partnership between the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Educopia Institute, along with the Council of State Archivists (CoSA) and nine universities that are educating future information professionals.

We’re addressing two main research questions:

  1. What are the primary institutional and technological factors that influence adoption of digital forensics tools and methods in different educational settings?
  2. What are the most viable mechanisms for sustaining collaboration among LIS programs on the adoption of digital forensics tools and methods?

The project started in September 2018 and will conclude in Fall 2021, and Educopia and UNC SILS will be conducting ongoing research and releasing open educational resources on a rolling basis. With the help of our Advisory Board made up of nine iSchools and our Professional Experts Panel composed of leaders in the GLAM sector, we’re:

  • Piloting instruction to produce and disseminate a publicly accessible set of learning objects that can be used by education providers to administer hands-on digital forensics education
  • Gathering information and centralizing existing educational content to produce guides and other resources, such as this (still-in-development) guide to datasets that can be used to learn new digital forensics skills or test digital archives software/processes
  • Investigating and reporting on institutional factors that facilitate, hinder and shape adoption of digital forensics educational offerings

Through this work and intentional community cultivation, we hope to advance a community of practice around digital forensics education though partner collaboration, wider engagement, and exploration of community sustainability mechanisms.

To support our research and steer the direction of the project, we have conducted and analyzed nine advisory board interviews with current faculty who have taught or are developing a curriculum for digital forensics education. So far we’ve learned that:

  • instructors want and need access to example datasets to use in the classroom (especially cultural heritage datasets);
  • many want lesson plans and activities for teaching born-digital archiving tools and environments like BitCurator in one or two weeks because few courses are devoted solely to digital forensics;
  • they want further guidance on how to facilitate hands-on digital forensics instruction in distributed online learning environments; and
  • they face challenges related to IT support at their home institutions, just like those grappled with by practitioners in the field.

This list barely scratches the surface of our exploration into the experiences and needs of instructors for providing more effective digital forensics education, and we’re excited to tackle the tough job of creating resources and instructional modules that address these and many other topics. We’re also interested in exploring how the resources we produce may also support continuing education needs across libraries, archives, and museums.

We recently conducted a Twitter chat with SAA’s SNAP Section to learn about students’ experiences in digital forensics learning environments. We heard a range of experiences, from students who reported they had no opportunity to learn about digital forensics in some programs, to students who received effective instruction that remained useful post-graduation. We hope that the learning modules released at the conclusion of our project will address students’ learning needs just as much as their instructors’ teaching needs.

Later this year, we’ll be conducting an educational provider survey that will gather information on barriers to adoption of digital forensics instruction in continuing education. We hope to present to and conduct workshops for a broader set of audiences including museum and public records professionals.

Our deliverables, from conference presentations to learning modules, will be released openly and freely through a variety of outlets including the project website, the BitCurator Consortium wiki, and YouTube (for recorded webinars). Follow along at the project website or contact jess.farrell@educopia.org if you have feedback or want to share your insights with the project team.

 

Authors bio:

Jess Farrell is the project manager for BitCuratorEdu and community coordinator for the Software Preservation Network at Educopia Institute. Katherine Skinner is the Executive Director of Educopia Institute, and Christopher (Cal) Lee is Associate Professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, teaching courses on archival administration, records management, and digital curation. Katherine and Cal are Co-PIs on the BitCuratorEdu project, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

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PASIG (Preservation and Archiving Special Interest Group) 2019 Recap

by Kelly Bolding

PASIG 2019 met the week of February 11th at El Colegio de México (commonly known as Colmex) in Mexico City. PASIG stands for Preservation and Archiving Special Interest Group, and the group’s meeting brings together an international group of practitioners, industry experts, vendors, and researchers to discuss practical digital preservation topics and approaches. This meeting was particularly special because it was the first time the group convened in Latin America (past meetings have generally been held in Europe and the United States). Excellent real-time bilingual translation for presentations given in both English and Spanish enabled conversations across geographical and lingual boundaries and made room to center Latin American preservationists’ perspectives and transformative post-custodial archival practice.

Perla Rodriguez of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) discusses an audiovisual preservation case study.

The conference began with broad overviews of digital preservation topics and tools to create a common starting ground, followed by more focused deep-dives on subsequent days. I saw two major themes emerge over the course of the week. The first was the importance of people over technology in digital preservation. From David Minor’s introductory session to Isabel Galina Russell’s overview of the digital preservation landscape in Mexico, presenters continuously surfaced examples of the “people side” of digital preservation (think: preservation policies, appraisal strategies, human labor and decision-making, keeping momentum for programs, communicating to stakeholders, ethical partnerships). One point that struck me during the community archives session was Verónica Reyes-Escudero’s discussion of “cultural competency as a tool for front-end digital preservation.” By conceptualizing interpersonal skills as a technology for facilitating digital preservation, we gain a broader and more ethically grounded idea of what it is we are really trying to do by preserving bits in the first place. Software and hardware are part of the picture, but they are certainly not the whole view.

The second major theme was that digital preservation is best done together. Distributed digital preservation platforms, consortial preservation models, and collaborative research networks were also well-represented by speakers from LOCKSS, Texas Digital Library (TDL), Duraspace, Open Preservation Foundation, Software Preservation Network, and others. The takeaway from these sessions was that the sheer resource-intensiveness of digital preservation means that institutions, both large and small, are going to have to collaborate in order to achieve their goals. PASIG seemed to be a place where attendees could foster and strengthen these collective efforts. Throughout the conference, presenters also highlighted failures of collaborative projects and the need for sustainable financial and governance models, particularly in light of recent developments at the Digital Preservation Network (DPN) and Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). I was particularly impressed by Mary Molinaro’s honest and informative discussion about the factors that led to the shuttering of DPN. Molinaro indicated that DPN would soon be publishing a final report in order to transparently share their model, flaws and all, with the broader community.

Touching on both of these themes, Carlos Martínez Suárez of Video Trópico Sur gave a moving keynote about his collaboration with Natalie M. Baur, Preservation Librarian at Colmex, to digitize and preserve video recordings he made while living with indigenous groups in the Mexican state of Chiapas. The question and answer portion of this session highlighted some of the ethical issues surrounding rights and consent when providing access to intimate documentation of people’s lives. While Colmex is not yet focusing on access to this collection, it was informative to hear Baur and others talk a bit about the ongoing technical, legal, and ethical challenges of a work-in-progress collaboration.

Presenters also provided some awesome practical tools for attendees to take home with them. One of the many great open resources session leaders shared was Frances Harrell (NEDCC) and Alexandra Chassanoff (Educopia)’s DigiPET: A Community Built Guide for Digital Preservation Education + Training Google document, a living resource for compiling educational tools that you can add to using this form. Julian Morley also shared a Preservation Storage Cost Model Google sheet that contains a template with a wealth of information about estimating the cost of different digital preservation storage models, including comparisons for several cloud providers. Amy Rudersdorf (AVP), Ben Fino-Radin (Small Data Industries), and Frances Harrell (NEDCC) also discussed helpful frameworks for conducting self-assessments.

Selina Aragon, Daina Bouquin, Don Brower, and Seth Anderson discuss the challenges of software preservation.

PASIG closed out by spending some time on the challenges involved with preserving emerging and complex formats. On the last afternoon of sessions, Amelia Acker (University of Texas at Austin) spoke about the importance of preserving APIs, terms of service, and other “born-networked” formats when archiving social media. She was followed by a panel of software preservationists who discussed different use cases for preserving binaries, source code, and other software artifacts.

Conference slides are all available online.

Thanks to the wonderful work of the PASIG 2019 steering, program, and local arrangements committees!


Kelly Bolding is the Project Archivist for Americana Manuscript Collections at Princeton University Library, as well as the team leader for bloggERS! She is interested in developing workflows for processing born-digital and audiovisual materials and making archival description more accurate, ethical, and inclusive.

Contribute to an ERS Community Project!

Please take this short survey to contribute to the 2019 ERS Community Project! The survey closes on Friday, March 29.

In December 2018, the ERS Steering Committee put out a call for ideas for a 2019 ERS community project. We’re thankful for the community input and are pleased to announce that we’re building a master list of digital archives and digital preservation resources that can be used for reference, or to provide a resource overlay for existing best practice and workflow documentation. The Committee has begun compiling resources and thinking about how they connect, but broader input is essential to this project’s success.

At this stage, we are interested in getting a sense of what the most useful resources are in our community. Please take our survey to share your top three go-to resources as well as any areas of electronic records work that you feel lack guidance and documentation. We are thinking of resources broadly, so feel free to suggest your three favorite journal articles, blogs, handbooks, workflows, tools and manuals, or any other style of resource that helps you process and preserve born-digital collections.

After the survey closes on Friday, March 29, we’ll compile and share the results. We also hope to eventually open up a community documentation space where anyone can add to our current list of resources. Once the data collection period is over, we’ll determine the best way to share a more polished version of this resource list.

On behalf of the ERS Steering Committee, thank you for participating!

  • Jessica Farrell
  • Jane Kelly
  • Susan Malsbury
  • Donald Mennerich
  • Kelsey O’Connell
  • Alice Prael
  • Jessica Venlet
  • Dorothy Waugh