Assessing the Digital Forensics Instruction Landscape with BitCuratorEdu

by Jess Farrell

This is the sixth post in the bloggERS Making Tech Skills a Strategic Priority series.

Over the past couple of months, we’ve heard a lot on bloggERS about how current students, recent grads, and mid-career professionals have made tech skills a strategic priority in their development plans. I like to think about the problem of “gaining tech skills” as being similar to “saving the environment”: individual action is needed and necessary, but it is most effective when it feeds clearly into systemic action.

So that begs the question, what root changes might educators of all types suggest and support to help GLAM professionals prioritize tech skills development? What are educator communities and systems – iSchools, faculty, and continuing education instructors – doing to achieve this? These questions are among those addressed by the BitCuratorEdu research project.

The BitCuratorEdu project is a two three-year effort funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to study and advance the adoption of born-digital archiving and digital forensics tools and methods in libraries and archives through a range of professional education efforts. The project is a partnership between the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Educopia Institute, along with the Council of State Archivists (CoSA) and nine universities that are educating future information professionals.

We’re addressing two main research questions:

  1. What are the primary institutional and technological factors that influence adoption of digital forensics tools and methods in different educational settings?
  2. What are the most viable mechanisms for sustaining collaboration among LIS programs on the adoption of digital forensics tools and methods?

The project started in September 2018 and will conclude in Fall 2021, and Educopia and UNC SILS will be conducting ongoing research and releasing open educational resources on a rolling basis. With the help of our Advisory Board made up of nine iSchools and our Professional Experts Panel composed of leaders in the GLAM sector, we’re:

  • Piloting instruction to produce and disseminate a publicly accessible set of learning objects that can be used by education providers to administer hands-on digital forensics education
  • Gathering information and centralizing existing educational content to produce guides and other resources, such as this (still-in-development) guide to datasets that can be used to learn new digital forensics skills or test digital archives software/processes
  • Investigating and reporting on institutional factors that facilitate, hinder and shape adoption of digital forensics educational offerings

Through this work and intentional community cultivation, we hope to advance a community of practice around digital forensics education though partner collaboration, wider engagement, and exploration of community sustainability mechanisms.

To support our research and steer the direction of the project, we have conducted and analyzed nine advisory board interviews with current faculty who have taught or are developing a curriculum for digital forensics education. So far we’ve learned that:

  • instructors want and need access to example datasets to use in the classroom (especially cultural heritage datasets);
  • many want lesson plans and activities for teaching born-digital archiving tools and environments like BitCurator in one or two weeks because few courses are devoted solely to digital forensics;
  • they want further guidance on how to facilitate hands-on digital forensics instruction in distributed online learning environments; and
  • they face challenges related to IT support at their home institutions, just like those grappled with by practitioners in the field.

This list barely scratches the surface of our exploration into the experiences and needs of instructors for providing more effective digital forensics education, and we’re excited to tackle the tough job of creating resources and instructional modules that address these and many other topics. We’re also interested in exploring how the resources we produce may also support continuing education needs across libraries, archives, and museums.

We recently conducted a Twitter chat with SAA’s SNAP Section to learn about students’ experiences in digital forensics learning environments. We heard a range of experiences, from students who reported they had no opportunity to learn about digital forensics in some programs, to students who received effective instruction that remained useful post-graduation. We hope that the learning modules released at the conclusion of our project will address students’ learning needs just as much as their instructors’ teaching needs.

Later this year, we’ll be conducting an educational provider survey that will gather information on barriers to adoption of digital forensics instruction in continuing education. We hope to present to and conduct workshops for a broader set of audiences including museum and public records professionals.

Our deliverables, from conference presentations to learning modules, will be released openly and freely through a variety of outlets including the project website, the BitCurator Consortium wiki, and YouTube (for recorded webinars). Follow along at the project website or contact jess.farrell@educopia.org if you have feedback or want to share your insights with the project team.

 

Authors bio:

Jess Farrell is the project manager for BitCuratorEdu and community coordinator for the Software Preservation Network at Educopia Institute. Katherine Skinner is the Executive Director of Educopia Institute, and Christopher (Cal) Lee is Associate Professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, teaching courses on archival administration, records management, and digital curation. Katherine and Cal are Co-PIs on the BitCuratorEdu project, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

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