An Interview with Elise Tanner – Director of Digital Projects and Initiatives at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Center for Arkansas History and Culture

This is the fifth post in the Conversations series.

FB_IMG_1535042441997Elise Tanner received her Master’s of Science in Library and Information Science from the iSchool at the University of Illinois in 2015. She was a Resident in the 2017/2018 National Digital Stewardship Residency for Art Information program. For the residency, she worked on a project to build a foundation for the preservation of the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s time-based media art collection. Today, she is the Director of Digital Projects and Initiatives at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Center for Arkansas History and Culture where she is taking the lead of all things digital.


“Try things.” “[Ask] lots of questions.”

Elise Tanner’s cheery force of will shines through the interviews we have over video chat. Her work in digital archives and preservation so far has been on the edges of the digital preservation map: preservation of Time-Based Media Art at the Museum of Philadelphia and this new position as the Director of Digital Projects & Initiatives at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Center for Arkansas History & Culture. She admits she doesn’t see her role as an “archivist” necessarily, but a preservationist — even if archival concepts can’t help but inform her work as she considers an upcoming born-digital remote transfer.

We talk about the way archives hold stories, show structural bias, and how cool it would be to incorporate soundscapes in future collections. Tanner is working on collaborative GIS projects with the GIS Lab in the University, getting the Digital Services Lab technology organized, thinking about how to best engage the graduate assistants/apprentices who do much of the digitizing work in the lab, in addition to all the work involved with getting up to speed with a new institution and a new home. The Center itself shares space with the Central Arkansas Library System’s Butler Center for Arkansas Studies, a unique partnership that includes shared reference work in the research room.

When I ask her what advice she has for newer professionals and students, she points to her first internship in an academic library: “It wasn’t what I really wanted [to be a reference librarian].” But it is necessary for people to try things out, see what is in the field, join the listservs and ask (more) questions. Another colleague who made a career change later in life began working at the Center as a graduate student in UALR’s Public History program and has remained at the Center as an Assistant Archivist for the past 10 years.  As for many things, the first attempt will not be your last.

Tanner’s route to digital archives reflects the current social-economic times and her desire to keep learning. After graduating with a BA in Photography from Columbia College in Chicago, she worked for three years at Starbucks before deciding on an online MLIS program to avoid moving. She admits that the program wasn’t really structured towards archival work, but she pulled together the courses needed to obtain a certificate in Special Collections. Tanner worked full time during her MLIS as a digital imaging technician for The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  This practical component, as well as access to practitioners who could answer Tanner’s many questions, would prove a valuable counter-balance to a mainly online program.

After graduation, Tanner applied for the 2017-2018 residency in the National Digital Stewardship Residency for Art Information, and while her first interview didn’t garner a position with that particular institution, the positive impression she created led to one of the other Resident positions with the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The residency work produced the base for “an approach to digital preservation of time-based media art (TBMA)” for the institution. It also provided Tanner with the opportunity to develop presentation and project management skills, as well as mentorship from other professionals and the residency organizers.

How did she find herself at Little Rock? “The staff here really sold it to me,” Tanner admits. After the usual job application grind and interviewing near-misses, she credits luck and hard work in landing a position that was a good fit for her skills and personality. She almost didn’t apply because the word Director in the title was intimidating, before looking closer at the requested skills and deciding to go for it. The match seems well made.

What are important skill sets for the nascent digital archivist/preservationist to develop according to Tanner? “Communication” she expands: learn to give an elevator speech; how to articulate your vision to a group; stay on top of an overwhelming email inbox; definitely mastering project management; how to prepare for and run a meeting; go to conferences and put yourself out there. Technical skills follow close behind: networks, security, any tools that will make your life easier in terms of communication and project management.  It might all sound overwhelming, but getting practical experience in the field will reveal your personal strengths and narrow down aspects you can work on – careers are a long game, try things – ask more questions.

What does the future hold for Tanner? Publishing her TBMA work is first on her list, but also aspires to one day collect the archives of the local Rock Town Roller Derby league, and eventually greater embedment with the local community. So definitely keep your eye out for more from this upcoming digital preservationist.


profile5Author Bio: Meghan Whyte is a former public librarian who currently works as a government records reappraisal archivist for Library and Archives Canada.

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“A Trial by Fire Process”: Digital Archiving at the State Historical Society of Missouri (Interview with Elizabeth Engel)

This is the fourth post in the Conversations series

Founded in 1898, the State Historical Society of Missouri (SHSMO) “collect[s], preserve[s], publish[es], exhibit[s], and make[s] available material related to all aspects and periods of Missouri history” (The State Historical Society of Missouri, “About Us”). Supporting this mission is a large staff that includes thirty-five full-time and twelve part-time employees, two research fellows, and a large number of volunteers and interns who work in one of SHSMO’s six Research Centers (The State Historical Society of Missouri, “About Us”). My interviewee, Senior Archivist Elizabeth Engel, serves at the Columbia Research Center on the University of Missouri campus. Elizabeth and her colleagues work to make SHSMO’s collections (e.g. the National Women and Media Collection) accessible to a wide variety of patrons, including film creators, reporters, and researchers from all walks of life.

Elizabeth’s entry into the archival field was due partly to happenstance. After enrolling in the University of Iowa’s (UI) School of Information Science, Elizabeth expected to work in public libraries—especially because she had worked in similar settings during her high school and college years. However, she seized upon an opportunity to complete a work-study assignment at the Iowa Women’s Archives (at the University of Iowa) and promptly discovered a passion for archives. After graduating from UI in 2006, SHSMO initially hired her as a Manuscript Specialist—and the rest is, well, history (The State Historical Society of Missouri, “SHSMO Staff”). As the senior archivist for the Columbia Research Center, Elizabeth’s day-to-day work involves processing collections; fulfilling various public services responsibilities, and developing biographical histories of Missouri’s most well-known citizens. Her greatest responsibility, however, is overseeing the Columbia Research Center’s accessioning efforts—particularly as it pertains to digital content.

Elizabeth’s Research Center has seen a marked increase in the amount of born-digital material that it takes in each year. This point is exemplified by SHSMO’s recent acquisition of Senator Claire McCaskill’s papers, which consists of approximately 3.25 cubic feet AND two terabytes of data. To tackle the challenges of managing such content, Elizabeth and her staff have employed a variety of tactics and tools. While MPLP-inspired collection-level descriptions have sufficed for physical collections, Elizabeth noted that digital content requires a more in-depth description for access and preservation purposes. Elizabeth’s work on other projects—such as the processing of the Missouri Broadcasters Association Radio Archives Collection—reinforced the importance of flexibility, as exemplified by her arrangement tactics (recordings are organized by call sign, and further accruals are added to the end of the finding aid) and description efforts (“some of the file names were in ALL CAPS and I decided to retain that for the time being as well…perhaps it will aid in retrieval).

This theme of flexibility emerged when Elizabeth discussed the different digital archiving tools that SHSMO staff have employed: Duke University’s DataAccessioner and Microsoft Excel spreadsheets (to create and organize metadata); various storage spaces, including network attached storage (NAS) units and a dark archive (both of which are accessible only to certain staff); thumb drives, used to deliver content to patrons; a Microsoft Access database, which serves as the institution’s collection management system; and BitCurator, which SHSMO staff set up to tackle larger and more complex collections (e.g. Senator McCaskill’s papers). Overall, effectively and efficiently managing these digital resources has been “a [constant] trial by fire process,” given the somewhat volatile nature of the digital archives field. In the future, Elizabeth hopes that SHSMO will adopt more user-friendly and compatible software—such as Archivematica and/or Access to Memory (AtoM)—to fulfill its mission. In fact, Elizabeth emphasized that finding such tools—especially cost-effective tools—represents one of the greater challenges facing modern archivists.

For the aspiring digital archivist, Elizabeth recommended seeking out practice-focused learning opportunities. To complement her largely theoretical UI coursework, Elizabeth completed the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) certificate; scans the field for published literature; and engages in other professional development efforts. She further recommended the workshops provided by Lyrasis as another opportunity to deepen one’s digital preservation knowledge. Elizabeth explained that the twenty-first-century digital archivist must remain flexible and commit to continual learning to stay on top of the field’s recent developments. She also emphasized that these same professionals must also be given sufficient time to learn and experiment with tools and workflows.

Before we digitally parted ways, Elizabeth offered one final and—in this writer’s opinion—exceptionally solid advice:

“You’re going to make mistakes and that’s okay. The DAS courses drilled it into me that ‘Doing something is better than nothing.’ Standards/tools are going to change and you can’t predict that. Sometimes all you can do is digital triage with the resources/time you have, so don’t let the doing things perfectly be the enemy of the good.”



Gentry_Photo_2018.jpgAuthor Bio: Steven Gentry is the Archives Technician for the St. Mary’s College of Maryland Archives. His responsibilities include processing collections and building finding aids; assisting with web and email archiving efforts; and researching tools and best practices pertaining to digital archives and electronic records.

 


An Interview With Caitlin Birch — Digital Collections and Oral History Archivist at the Rauner Special Collections Library, Dartmouth

Interview conducted with Caitlin Birch by Juli Folk in March 2019

This is the third post in the Conversations series

Meet Caitlin Birch

Caitlin Birch is the Digital Collections and Oral History Archivist for the Rauner Special Collections Library at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire: she sat down with Juli Folk, a graduate student at the University of Maryland-College Park iSchool, who is pursuing an archives-focused MLIS and certificate in Museum Scholarship and Material Culture. Caitlin’s descriptions of her career path, her roles and achievements, and her insights into the challenges she faces helped frame a discussion of helpful skill sets for working with born-digital archival records on a daily basis.

Caitlin’s Career Path

As an undergraduate, Caitlin majored in English, concentrating in journalism with minors in history and Irish studies. After a few years working as a reporter and editor, she began to consider a different career path, looking for other fields that emphasize constant learning, storytelling, and contributions to the historical record. In time, she decided on a dual degree (MA/MSLIS) in history and archives management from Simmons College (now Simmons University). Throughout grad school, her studies focused on both historical methods and original research as well as archival theory and practice.

When asked about the path to her current position, Caitlin responded, “To the extent that my program allowed, I tried to take courses with a digital focus whenever I could. I also completed two internships and worked in several paraprofessional positions, which were really invaluable to preparing me for professional work in the field. I finished my degrees in December 2013 and landed my job at Dartmouth a few months later.” She now works as the Digital Collections and Oral History Archivist for Rauner Special Collections Library, the home of Dartmouth College’s rare books, manuscripts, and archives, compartmentalized within the larger academic research library.

Favorite Aspects of Being an Archivist

For Caitlin, the best aspects of being an archivist are working at the intersection of history and technology; teaching and interacting with people every day; and having new opportunities to create, innovate, and learn. Her position includes roles in both oral history and born-digital records, and on any given day she may be juggling tasks like teaching students oral history methodology, working on the implementation of a digital repository, building Dartmouth’s web archiving program, managing staff, sharing reference desk duty, and staying abreast of the profession via involvement with the SAA and the New England Archivists Executive Board. “I like that no two days are the same,” she shared, adding, “I like that my work can have a positive impact on others.”

Challenges of Being an Archivist

Caitlin pointed out that aspects of the profession change and evolve at a pace that can make it difficult to keep up, especially when job- or project-related tasks demand so much attention. She also noted other challenges: “More and more we’re grappling with issues like the ethical implications of digital archives and the environmental impact of digital preservation.” That said, she finds that “the biggest challenge is also the biggest opportunity: most of what I do hasn’t been done before at Dartmouth. I’m the first digital archivist to be hired at my institution, so everything—infrastructure, policies, workflows, etc.—has been/is being built from the ground up. It’s exciting and often very daunting, especially because this corner of the archives field is dynamic.”

Advice for Students and Young Professionals

As a result, Caitlin emphasized the importance of experimentation and failure. “Traditional archival practice is well-defined and there are standards to guide it, but digital archives present all kinds of unique challenges that didn’t exist until very recently. Out of necessity, you have to innovate and try new things and learn from failure in order to get anywhere.” For this reason, she recommended building a good professional network and finding time to keep up with the professional literature. “It’s really key to cultivate a community of practice with colleagues at other institutions.”

When asked whether she sets aside time specified for these tasks or if she finds that networking and research are natural outputs of her daily work, Caitlin stated that networking comes more easily because of her involvement with professional organizations. However, finding time for professional literature and research proved more difficult, a concern Caitlin brought to her manager. In response, he encouraged her to block 1-2 hours on her calendar at the same time every week to catch up on reading and professional news. She remains grateful for that support: “I would hope that every manager in this profession encourages time for regular professional development. It may seem like it’s taking time away from job responsibilities, but in actuality it’s helping you to build the skills and knowledge you need for future innovation.”


SAA-bloggERS-headshot-Juli_Folk

Juli Folk is finishing the MLIS program at the University of Maryland-College Park iSchool, specializing in Archives and Digital Curation. Previously a corporate editor and project manager, Juli’s graduate work supplements her passions for writing, art, and technology with formal archival training, to refocus her career on cultural heritage institutions.

An Interview with Erica Titkemeyer – Project Director and AV Conservator at the Southern Folklife Collection, UNC

Interview conducted with Erica Titkemeyer by Morgan McKeehan in March 2019.

This is the second post in a new series of conversations between emerging professionals and archivists actively working with digital materials.


Erica is the Project Director and AV Conservator at the Southern Folklife Collection, in Wilson Special Collections Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s University Libraries.Erica Titkemeyer

Tell us a little bit about the path that brought you to your current position.

As an undergrad I majored in Cinema and Photography, which initially put me in contact with many of the analog-based obsolete formats our team at UNC works to digitize now. It was also during this time when I saw how varied new proprietary born-digital formats could be based on camera types, capture settings, and editing environments, and how these files could be just as problematic as film and magnetic-based formats when trying to access content over time. Whether projects originated on something like DVCAM or P2 cards, codec and file format compatibility issues were a daily occurrence in classes. After undergrad I went through NYU’s Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program where courses in digital preservation helped instill a lot of the foundational knowledge I use today.

After grad school, I spent 9 months in the inaugural National Digital Stewardship Residency cohort in Washington, D.C., where I worked at Smithsonian Institution Archives to explore digital preservation needs and challenges of digital media art.

My current position is primarily concerned with the timely digitization, preservation and access of obsolete analog audiovisual formats, but our digital tape-based collections are growing, and there are many born-digital accessions with a myriad of audio and video file formats that we need to make decisions about now to ensure they’re around for the long term.

What type of institution do you currently work at and where is it located?

I work within Wilson Special Collections Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s University Libraries. I am situated in the Southern Folklife Collection, which holds the majority of audiovisual recordings in Wilson Library; however my team has expanded to work with all audiovisual recordings in the building as part of a new Andrew W. Mellon grant, Extending the Reach of Southern Audiovisual Sources: Expansion.

What do you love most about working with AV archival materials?

I’ve always been excited to learn about moving image and sound technologies and how they fit into historical contexts. Even if I know nothing about a collection except for the format, there’s enough there to understand the time and circumstances the recordings were created in. This is just as much the case for born-digital audiovisual files as it is for analog. We’ve seen file formats, codecs, and recording equipment go by the wayside, and so they exist as markers of a particular time.

What’s the biggest challenge affecting your work (and/or the field at large)?

Current and future digital video capabilities can provide a lot of options for documentarians and filmmakers, which is great news for them, but it also means there’s going to be a flood of new file formats with encodings and specifications we have not dealt with, many of which will already be difficult to access by the time they make it to our library because of planned obsolescence. We’ve already started to see these collections come in, and it’s impossible to normalize everything to our audiovisual target preservation specifications while still retaining quality for various reasons. Fortunately, there are a lot of folks thinking about this who are building some precedent when it comes to making decisions about the files. Julia Kim at Library of Congress, Rebecca Fraimow at WGBH, and I have also done a couple panel talks on this and recently put out an article through Code4Lib on this topic (https://journal.code4lib.org/articles/14244).

What advice would you give yourself as a student or professional first delving into digital archives work?

Everything can seem very overwhelming. There are a lot of directions to take in audiovisual preservation and archiving, and digital archiving and preservation is the shiny new frontier, but there’s a lot to gain by starting with what you know and taking it from there. I think building my knowledge and expertise in analog preservation risks inevitably helps me in tackling some of the more challenging aspects of born-digital audiovisual preservation.


Morgan McKeehanMorgan McKeehan is the Digital Collections Specialist in the Repository Services Department, within the University Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In this role, she provides support for the management of and access to digitized and born-digital materials from across the Libraries’ special collections units.

An Interview with Amy Berish – Assistant Archivist at the Rockefeller Archive Center

by Georgia Westbrook

This is the first post in a new series of conversations between emerging professionals and archivists actively working with digital materials.

Amy Berish is an Assistant Archivist at the Rockefeller Archive Center in Sleepy Hollow, New York. There, she is a member of the Processing Team, working on processing collections that cover a wide range of philanthropic history and a variety of materials. A recent graduate of the University of Pittsburgh Master of Library and Information Science program, Amy has generously shared her path and experiences with bloggERS!

Amy began working in her local library when she was 14 and went on to major in library and information science as an undergraduate. While there and throughout graduate school, she worked at the university library, took various internships, and worked for school credit at the preservation lab, all in an effort to find her place in the library and archives world.

In her current role at the Rockefeller Archive Center, she works as part of a larger staff to process incoming collections in both paper and digital formats. The Rockefeller Archive Center collects materials related to the Rockefeller family, but also several other large philanthropic organizations, including the Ford Foundation, the Near East Foundation, the Commonwealth Fund, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the Henry Luce Foundation, and the W. T. Grant Foundation, among others. While she shied away from working with digital formats and learning coding skills during college, she has had the opportunity to pursue that work in her current role and has embraced the challenges that have come with it.

“I feel like digital work is the biggest challenge right now, in both the work I am doing and the work of the broader archival profession,” she said. “Learning to navigate the technical skills required to do some of the work we are doing can be especially daunting. Having a positive attitude about change and a willingness to learn is often easier said than done – but I also think these two factors could help make this type of work seem more doable.”

Amy has found support in her teams at the Rockefeller Archive Center and in the archives community in and around New York City. For example, Digital Team members at the Rockefeller Archive Center reminded her that it would be ok to break things in the code, and that they would be able to fix it if she wanted to experiment with a new way of scripting. She has also found support in online forums, which have allowed her to connect to others doing related work across the country.

Beyond scripting, part of her position requires her to deal with formats that might be obsolete or nearly so, and to face policy questions regarding proprietary information and copyright. Like coding however, Amy has used her enthusiasm for learning new skills as an asset in facing these challenges.

“I love learning new things and as a processing archivist, it’s part of my job to continue to learn more about various topics through each collection I process,” Amy said. “I also get the opportunity to learn through some of the digital projects I am working on. I have learned to automate processes by writing scripts. I have also had a lot experience lately working with legacy digital media – from optical disks and floppies to zip disks and Bernoulli disks – it has been a challenge trying to get 10-year-old media to function properly!”

As a new professional, Amy was quick to mention some of the challenges that archivists can face at the beginning of their career. Still, she said, a pat on the back for each small step you take is well-deserved. She cited one of her graduate school professors, who encouraged her to cultivate an “ethos of fearlessness” when facing technology; she said the phrase has become a mantra in her current position. Since that, Amy acknowledged, is easier said than done, especially while you’re still in school, she has three other pieces of advice to share for others just starting out in digital archives work: Take the opportunities you’re given, always be ready to learn, and don’t be afraid digital work.


Georgia Westbrook is an MSLIS student at Syracuse University. She’s interested in visual resources, oral histories, digital publishing, and open access. Connect with her on LinkedIn or on her website.

Call for Contributions: Conversations Series!

Digital skills have become increasingly important for both new and established archivists of all stripes, not just those with “digital” in their job titles. This series aims to foster relationships and facilitate the sharing of knowledge between archivists who are already working with born-digital records and those who are interested in building their digital skills. In collaboration with SAA’s Students and New Professionals (SNAP) section, the Electronic Records Section seeks students and new professionals to conduct brief interviews of people working with born-digital records about what it’s like on a daily basis, as well as career pathways, helpful skill sets, and other topics. Students/new professionals will then write up the interviews for publication on both the ERS and SNAP section blogs. We are currently seeking volunteers for both interviewers and interviewees. Please see additional information about both roles below, and fill out this short Google form to sign up!

Call for interviewers:

  • You are: a student or new professional (or anyone else interested in learning more about what digital archivists do)
  • You will:
    • Get paired with an archivist who is well-versed in digital records
    • Schedule and conduct a brief interview (via chat/email, video, phone, etc.), using your own interview questions (plus a few we’ll suggest)
    • Write up the interview into a blog post and run it by your interviewee for review
    • Build a relationship with a cool archivist; learn and help others learn about born-digital archives work

Call for interviewees:

  • You are: a digital archivist or an archivist with any job title who works with born-digital records
  • You will:
    • Get paired with a student/new professional
    • Participate in a brief interview (via chat/email, video, phone, etc.)
    • Review the interview write-up prior to publication
    • Build a relationship with an awesome student/new professional; generously share your expertise/wisdom with others in the field

Writing for bloggERS! “Conversations” Series

  • Written content should be roughly 600-800 words in length (ok to exceed a bit)
  • Write posts for a wide audience: anyone who stewards, studies, or has an interest in digital archives and electronic records, both within and beyond SAA
  • Align with other editorial guidelines as outlined in the bloggERS! guidelines for writers.

Posts for this series will start in March, so let us know if you are interested in participating by filling out this (short) Google form ASAP. Send any questions to ers.mailer.blog@gmail.com!

Trained in Classification, Without Classification

by Ashley Blewer

This is the first post in the bloggERS Making Tech Skills a Strategic Priority series.

Hi, SAA ERS readers! My name is Ashley Blewer, and I am sort of an archivist, sort of a developer, and sort of something else I haven’t quite figured out what to call myself. I work for a company for Artefactual Systems, and we make digital preservation and access software called Archivematica and AtoM (Access to Memory) respectively. My job title is AV Preservation Specialist, which is true, that is what I specialize in, and maybe that fulfills part of that “sort of something else I haven’t quite figured out.” I’ve held a lot of different roles in my career, as digital preservation consultant, open source software builder and promoter, developer at a big public library, archivist at a small public film archive, and other things. This, however, is my first time working for an open source technology company that makes software used by libraries, archives, museums, and other organizations in the cultural heritage sector. I think this is a rare vantage point from which to look at the field and its relationship to technology, and I think that even within this rare position, we have an even more unique culture and mentality around archives and technology that I’d like to talk about.

Within Archivematica, we have a few loosely defined types of jobs. There are systems archivists, which we speak of internally as analysts, there are developers (software engineers), and there are also systems operations folks (systems administrators and production support engineers). We have a few other roles that sit more at the executive level, but there isn’t a wall between any of these roles, as even those who are classified as being “in management” also work as analysts or systems engineers when called upon to do so. My role also sits between a lot of these loosely defined roles — I suppose I am technically classified as an analyst, and I run with the fellow analyst crew: I attend their meetings, work directly with clients, and other preservation-specific duties, but I also have software development skills, and can perform more traditionally technical tasks like writing code, changing how things function at a infrastructure level, and reviewing and testing the code that has been written by others. I’m still learning the ropes (I have been at the organization full-time for 4 months), but I am increasingly able to do some simple system administration tasks too, mostly for clients that need me to log in and check out what’s going on with their systems. This seems to be a way in which roles at my company and within the field (I hope) are naturally evolving. Another example is my brilliant colleague Ross Spencer who works as a software engineer, but has a long-established career working within the digital preservation space, so he definitely lends a hand providing crucial insight when doing “analyst-style” work.

We are a technical company, and everyone on staff has some components that are essential to a well-rounded digital preservation systems infrastructure. For example, all of us know how to use Git (a version control management system made popular by Github) and we use it as a regular part of our job, whether we are writing code or writing documentation for how to use our software. But “being technical” or having technical literacy skills involves much, much more than writing code. My fellow analysts have to do highly complex and nuanced workflow development and data mapping work, figuring out niche bugs associated with some of the microservices we run, and articulating in common human language some of the very technical parts of a large software system. I think Artefactual’s success as a company comes from the collective ability to foster a safe, warm, and collaborative environment that allows anyone on the team to get the advice or support they need to understand a technical problem, and use that knowledge to better support our software, every Archivematica user (client or non-client), and the larger digital preservation community. This is the most important part of any technical initiative or training, and it is the most fundamental component of any system.

I don’t write this as a representative for Artefactual, but as myself, a person who has held many different roles at many different institutions all with different relationships to technology, and this has by far been the most healthy and on-the-job educational experience I have had, and I think those two things go hand-in-hand. I can only hope that other organizations begin to narrow the line between “person who does archives work” and “technical person” in a way that supports collaboration and cross-training between people coming into the field with different backgrounds and experiences. We are all in this together, and the only way we are gonna get things done is if we work closely together.



Ashley works as at Artefactual Systems as their AV Preservation Specialist, primarily on the Archivematica project. She specializes in time-based media preservation, digital repository management, infrastructure/community building, computer-to-human interpretation, and teaching technical concepts. She is an active contributor to MediaArea’s MediaConch, a open source digital video file conformance checker software project, and Bay Area Video Coalition’s QCTools, an open source digitized video analysis software project. She holds Master of Library and Information Science (Archives) and Bachelor of Arts (Graphic Design) degrees from the University of South Carolina.

Meet the 2018 Candidates: Scott Kirycki

The 2018 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! To support your getting to know the candidates, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2018 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2018 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open through July 17!

Candidate name: Scott Kirycki

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

My journey to becoming an archivist began somewhere that did not, strictly speaking, exist: the fictional worlds of radio programs from the 1940s. When I was a boy, a local radio station replayed old shows such as The Lone Ranger, The Shadow, and The Jack Benny Program. The shows pulled me in with their appeal to the imagination, and I wanted to learn more about them. My parents and teachers had taught me well about the library, and my interest in radio programs (and soon my interest in the historical period that produced them) provided a new focus for the use of library resources. I checked out books, records, and tapes and studied the non-circulating reference material. Later, as I worked on more research projects for school assignments, I learned how to use The Reader’s Guide to Periodical Literature, and that led me to the treasures contained in bound volumes of magazines and on microfilm.

After starting college and choosing English as my major, I spent more time in libraries, particularly academic libraries with their special collections and emphasis on research. I grew to enjoy the research part of college work especially, which prompted me to pursue a master’s in English literature. When the time came for me to do a thesis for my degree, I picked a bibliographic research project over a literary interpretation or analysis. I created an annotated bibliography of the books advertised in The Tatler, an eighteenth-century British periodical.

Given my interest in research and the amount of time I spent in libraries, I considered following my master’s in English with a degree in library science. Since I liked historical material, I thought of studying to work in an archive. Although I looked into applying at some schools of library science, I was not wholeheartedly enthusiastic about additional years of schooling at that point in my life, so my journey took a turn to the business world.

The company where I began working after grad school turned out to be a good fit for me. The work connected to my interest in research because it involved making computerized databases for lawyers. I learned about database software, indexing, document scanning, and some electronic records management. In time, I became a department manager and later moved to project management. Regrettably for me, the company was eventually sold, and the new owners started a course of restructuring that culminated with the elimination of my position.

After exploring the job market, I reached the conclusion that further education would be a rewarding pursuit – rewarding not just from the standpoint of increasing the likelihood of landing a job, but also rewarding for personal growth and the opportunity to learn from other people. Because I had considered library science before and still had an interest in the things of the past, I decided to return to school to earn a degree in library science with a focus on archives. I was drawn to courses on digital content where I could continue to use and build on the experience and data-handling skills that I gained during my first career.

Though my decision to become an archivist was a long time coming, I am glad to have made it and look forward to continuing to discover the rewards of working in a field where I can benefit others by helping them connect to information.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

As I have been working on projects with the Records Management Team at the University of Notre Dame, I have become increasingly aware of how many electronic records consist of data points in enterprise-size content management systems rather than discrete files such as Word docs and PDFs. I anticipate that archiving databases as well as material from systems that were not necessarily designed with long-term preservation in mind will be a growing challenge for archivists. I would like to see the Electronic Records Section put forward guidance on best practices for meeting this challenge.

What cartoon character do you model yourself after?

The Tick (from the 1994 – 1996 Fox animated series)

Meet the 2018 Candidates: Kelsey O’Connell

The 2018 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! To support your getting to know the candidates, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2018 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2018 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open through July 17!

Candidate name: Kelsey O’Connell

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

As a history/English major in college, I knew I didn’t want to become a teacher or a lawyer so I began exploring other career options. I landed a position as a student assistant in my college library’s Special Collections and Archives department where I began processing collections. I immediately loved the organization, research, and learning that I participated in daily and realized I just wanted to do this for the rest of my life.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

My primary interest is employing ERS’s platform to influence SAA and related organizations to begin creating and formalizing documentation for electronic records. We all talk about documentation a lot, but we still haven’t rolled them out. I think a strategic approach to initiating much of this documentation is for ERS to survey, index, and prioritize various policies, guidelines, standards, and frameworks needed to have robust documentation on the management and care of electronic records. We’d be able to utilize Section members’ input and participation in the discussion, allowing us to have a comprehensive yet diverse perspective for our recommendations.

What cartoon character do you model yourself after?

I have to admit I had to ask my family and friends for help identifying this one. More than a few of them said Velma from Scooby Doo. I laughed because I assumed it was because I really can’t see without my glasses – like when my cat enjoys knocking them off my nightstand in the middle of the night and I have to search for them in the morning. But they all said it’s because I like figuring stuff out. Although mystery isn’t my favorite genre, there are some clear parallels to researching and employing some trial and error tactics with electronic records.

Meet the 2018 Candidates: Jane Kelly

The 2018 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! To support your getting to know the candidates, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2018 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2018 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open through July 17!

Candidate name: Jane Kelly

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

My first contact with archives was as a college intern. The position was unpaid, required an expensive ninety minute commute each way, and wasn’t exactly thrilling. I spent most of that job with my headphones in, dusting red rot off of books, waiting to go home. This was not my dream job. It wasn’t until several years after I finished college that I found myself truly engaged with archives as a career path. I studied history as an undergrad but chose not to pursue a PhD, so I was happy to find myself in a job where understanding the past really matters. I began to appreciate the ways in which archives and archivists construct narratives of the past in their everyday work. For better or worse, there’s a lot of power in what we do. More importantly, it was the people I worked with who made me want to become an archivist. Having coworkers who took the time to teach me on the job, especially before I started grad school, has been invaluable. Working with people who encouraged me to attend conferences, grapple with big questions, and take on responsibility made me want to keep working and learning. Without that, I’m not sure that I would have stuck around.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

I would love to see the Electronic Records Section become an even greater resource for other SAA sections. It seems inevitable that everyone who works in archives will need to understand electronic records and born-digital material, at least at a basic level. ERS seems like the obvious hub for those resources. I want other archivists to see that they are capable of understanding issues unique to electronic records and that they don’t need to be intimidated by this part of the field. As a young professional, I’m also particularly interested in partnering with SNAP. Access to mentorship has been really important for me, both in terms of choosing to stay in the archives profession and learning how to do the work. I would like to see deeper connections between these two groups and find ways to support folks who don’t have resources to pay for SAA courses to supplement what they learn in graduate school.

What cartoon character do you model yourself after?

This is a hard question. I’ll go with Eliza Thornberry because she’s a smart kid, and I also wish I could talk to my cat.