Securing Our Digital Legacy: An Introduction to the Digital Preservation Coalition

by Sharon McMeekin, Head of Workforce Development


Nineteen years ago, the digital preservation community gathered in York, UK, for the Cedars Project’s Preservation 2000 conference. It was here that the first seeds were sown for what would become the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC). Guided by Neil Beagrie, then of King’s College London and Jisc, work to establish the DPC continued over the next 18 months and, in 2002, representatives from 7 organizations signed the articles that formally constituted the DPC.

In the 17 years since its creation, the DPC has gone from strength to strength, the last 10 years under the leadership of current Executive Director, William Kilbride. The past decade has been a particular period of growth, as shown by the rise in the staff compliment from 2 to 7. We now have more than 90 members who represent an increasingly diverse group of organizations from 12 countries across sectors including cultural heritage, higher education, government, banking, industry, media, research and international bodies.

DPC staff, chair, and president

Our mission at the DPC is to:

[…] enable our members to deliver resilient long-term access to digital content and services, helping them to derive enduring value from digital assets and raising awareness of the strategic, cultural and technological challenges they face.

We work to achieve this through a broad portfolio of work across six strategic areas of activity: Community Engagement, Advocacy, Workforce Development, Capacity Building, Good Practice and Standards, and Management and Governance. Everything we do is member-driven and they guide our activities through the DPC Board, Representative Council, and Sub-Committees which oversee each strategic area.

Although the DPC is driven primarily by the needs of our members, we do also aim to contribute to the broader digital preservation community. As such, many of the resources we develop are made publicly available. In the remainder of this blog post, I’ll be taking a quick look at each of the DPC’s areas of activity and pointing out resources you might find useful.

1 | Community Engagement

First up is our work in the area of Community Engagement. Here our aim is to enable “a growing number of agencies and individuals in all sectors and in all countries to participate in a dynamic and mutually supportive digital preservation community”. Collaboration is a key to digital preservation success, and we hope to encourage and support it by helping build an inclusive and active community. An important step in achieving this aim was the publication of our ‘Inclusion and Diversity Policy’ in 2018.

Webinars are key to building community engagement amongst our members. We invite speakers to talk to our members about particular topics and share experiences through case studies. These webinars are recorded and made available for members to watch at a later date. We also run a monthly ‘Members Lounge’ to allow informal sharing of current work and discussion of issues as they arise and, on the public end of the website, a popular blog, covering case studies, new innovations, thought pieces, recaps of events and more.

2 | Advocacy

Our advocacy work campaigns “for a political and institutional climate more responsive and better informed about the digital preservation challenge”, as well as “raising awareness about the new opportunities that resilient digital assets create”. This tends to happen on several levels, from enabling and aiding members’ advocacy efforts within their own organizations, through raising legislators’ and policy makers’ awareness of digital preservation, to educating the wider populace.

To help those advocating for digital preservation within their own context, we have recently published our Executive Guide. The Guide provides a grab bag of statements and facts to help make the case for digital preservation, including key messages, motivators, opportunities to be gained and risks faced. We welcome any suggestions for additions or changes to this resource!

Our longest running advocacy activity is the biannual Digital Preservation Awards, last held in 2018. The Awards aim to celebrate excellence and innovation in digital preservation across a range of categories. This high-profile event has been joined in recent years by two other activities with a broad remit and engagement. The first is the Bit List of Digitally Endangered Species, which highlights at risk digital information, showing both where preservation work is needed and where efforts have been successful. Finally, there is World Digital Preservation Day (WDPD), a day to showcase digital preservation around the globe. Response to WDPD since its inauguration in 2017 has been exceptionally positive. There’s been tweets, blogs, events, webinars, and even a song and dance! This year WDPD is scheduled for 7th November, and we encourage everyone to get involved.

The nominees, winners, and judges for the 2018 Digital Preservation Awards

3 | Workforce Development

Workforce Development activities at the DPC focus on “providing opportunities for our members to acquire, develop and retain competent and responsive workforces that are ready to address the challenges of digital preservation”. There are many threads to this work, but key for our members are the scholarships we provide through our Career Development Fund and free access to the training courses we run.

At the moment we offer three training courses: ‘Getting Started with Digital Preservation’, ‘Making Progress with Digital Preservation’ and ‘Advocacy for Digital Preservation’, but we have plans to expand the portfolio in the coming year. All of our training courses are available to non-members for a modest fee, but at the moment are mostly held face to face in the UK and Ireland. A move to online training provision is, however, planned for 2020. We are also happy to share training resources and have set up a Slack workspace to enable this and greater collaboration with regards to digital preservation training.

Other resources that may prove helpful that fall under our Workforce Development heading include the ‘Digital Preservation Handbook’, a free online publication covering a digital preservation in the broadest sense. The Handbook aims to be a comprehensive guide for those starting with digital preservation, whilst also offering links additional resources. The content for Handbook was crowd-sourced from experts and has all been peer reviewed. Another useful and slightly less well-known series of publications are our ‘Topical Notes’, originally funded by the National Archives of Ireland, and intended to create resources that introduced key digital preservation issues to a non-specialist audience (particularly record creators). Each note is only two pages long and jargon-free, so a great resource to help raise awareness.

4 | Capacity Building

Perhaps the biggest area of DPC work covers Capacity Building, that is “supporting and assuring our members in the delivery and maintenance of high quality and sustainable digital preservation services through knowledge exchange, technology watch, research and development.” This can take the form of direct member support, helping with tasks such as policy development and procurement, as well as participation in research projects.

Our more advanced publication series, the Technology Watch Reports, also sit below the Capacity Building heading. Written by experts and peer reviewed, each report takes a deeper dive into a particular digital preservation issue. Our latest report on Email Preservation is currently available for member preview but will be publicly released shortly. Some other ‘classics’ include Preserving Social Media, Personal Digital Archiving, and the always popular The Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Reference Model: Introductory Guide (2nd Edition) (I always tell those new to OAIS to start here rather than the 200+ dry pages of the full standard!)

We also run around six thematic Briefing Day events a year on topical issues. As with the training, these are largely held in the UK and Ireland, but they are now also live-streamed for members. We support a number of Thematic Task Forces and Working Groups, with the ‘Web Archiving and Preservation Working Group’ being particularly active at the moment.

DPC members engaged in a brainstorming session

5 | Good Practice and Standards

Our Good Practice and Standards stream of work was a new addition as of the publication of our latest Strategic Plan (2018-22). Here we are contributing work towards “identifying and developing good practice and standards that make digital preservation achievable, supporting efforts to ensure services are tightly matched to shifting requirements.”

We hope this work will allow us to input into standards with the needs of our members in mind and facilitate the sharing of good practice that already happens across the coalition. This has already borne fruit in the shape of the forthcoming DPC Rapid Assessment Model, a maturity model to help with benchmarking digital preservation progress within your organization. You can read a bit more about it in this blog post by Jen Mitcham and the model will be released publicly in late September.

We also work with vendors through our Supporter Program and events like our ‘Digital Futures’ series to help bridge the gap between practice and solutions.

6 | Management and Governance

Our final stream of work is less focused on digital preservation and instead on “ensuring the DPC is a sustainable, competent organization focussed on member needs, providing a robust and trusted platform for collaboration within and beyond the Coalition.” This obviously relates to both the viability of the organization and well as good governance. It is essential that everything we do is transparent and that the members can both direct what we do and ensure accountability.

The Future

Before I depart, I thought I would share a little bit about some of our plans for the future. In the next few years we’ll be taking steps to further internationalize as an organization. At the moment our membership is roughly 75% UK and Ireland and 25% international, but those numbers are gradually moving closer and we hope that continues. With that in mind we will be investigating new ways to deliver services and resources online, as well as in languages beyond English. We’re starting this year with the publication of our prospectus in German, French and Spanish.

We’re also beginning to look forward to our 20th anniversary in 2022. It’s a Digital Preservation Awards Year, so that’s reason enough for a celebration, but we will also be welcoming the digital preservation community to Glasgow, Scotland, as hosts of iPRES 2022. Plans are already afoot for the conference, and we’re excited to make it a showcase for both the community and one of our home cities. Hopefully we’ll see you there, but I encourage you to make use of our resources and to get in touch soon!

Access our Knowledge Base: https://www.dpconline.org/knowledge-base

Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dpc_chat

Find out how to join us: https://www.dpconline.org/about/join-us


Sharon McMeekin is Head of Workforce Development with the Digital Preservation Coalition and leads on work including training workshops and their scholarship program. She is also Managing Editor of the ‘Digital Preservation Handbook’. With Masters degrees in Information Technology and Information Management and Preservation, both from the University of Glasgow, Sharon is an archivist by training, specializing in digital preservation. She is also an ILM qualified trainer. Before joining the DPC she spent five years as Digital Archivist with RCAHMS. As an invited speaker, Sharon presents on digital preservation at a wide variety of training events, conferences and university courses.

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A Conversation with Annalise Berdini, Digital Archivist at the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, Princeton University

Interview conducted with Annalise Berdini in May 2019 by Hannah Silverman and Tamar Zeffren

This is the eighth post in a new series of conversations between emerging professionals and archivists actively working with digital materials.


Annalise Berdini is the Digital Archivist at the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library at Princeton University, a position she has held since January 2018. She is responsible for the ongoing management of the University Archives Digital Curation Program, as well as managing a collection of web archives and assisting with reference services.

Annalise’s first post-graduate school position was as a manuscripts and archives processor at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). While she was working at UCSD, universities and archives were slowly starting to see the need for a dedicated digital archivist position. When the Special Collections department at UCSD created their first digital archivist position, Annalise applied and got the job. She explains that a good deal of her work there, and at Princeton, is graciously supported by a community of digital archivists solving similar challenges in other institutions.

As Annalise has now held a digital archivist role at two different institutions, both universities, we were interested to hear her perspectives on how colleagues and researchers have understood – or misunderstood – her role. “Because I have digital in my job title,” she noted, “people interpret that in a lot of very wide and broad ways. Really digital archives is still an emerging field…there are so many questions to answer, and it’s fun to investigate that aspect of the field.”

Given prevailing concerns among institutional archives about preserving and processing legacy media, we were keenly interested in hearing Annalise’s insights about securing stakeholder buy-in to develop a digital archives program.

“It’s a struggle everywhere,” she acknowledges. Presently, Princeton’s efforts to build up a more robust digital preservation program have led the University to a partnership with a UK-based company called Arkivum, which offers digital preservation, storage, maintenance, auditing and reporting modules and has the capacity to incorporate services from Archivematica and create a customized digital storage solution for Princeton.

“We’ve been lucky here [at Mudd]. We’re getting this great system. There is buy-in and there seems to be a pretty strong push right now. For us, the most compelling argument we’ve had is that we are mandated to collect student materials and student records that will not exist anywhere else unless we take them. The school has to keep those records, there’s not an option. Emphasizing how easily that content could be lost without a proper digital preservation system in place was very compelling to people who weren’t necessarily aware of the fact that hard drives sitting on a shelf are really not acceptable storage choices and options.”

Annalise has also found that deploying some compelling statistics can aid in building awareness around digital archives needs. In discussions about how rapidly materials can degrade, Annalise likes to cite a 2013 Western Archives article, “Capturing and Processing Born-Digital Files in the STOP AIDS Project Records,” which showcases findings that out of a vast collection of optical storage media, “only 10% of these hundreds of DVDs were really able to be recovered, whereas, strangely, a lot of the floppy disks were better and easier to recover…I think emphasizing how fragile digital content is [can help people understand] how easily it will corrupt without you even knowing it.”

Equally as important to generating momentum for such programs are the direct relationships Annalise cultivates with colleagues, within and without the archives. “My boss was really instrumental in the process, and the head of library IT helped me navigate getting approvals from the University as a whole and the University IT department.”

The complex process of sustaining and innovating a digital archives infrastructure provides ongoing opportunities for Annalise to “solve puzzles” and to unite colleagues in confronting the challenges of documenting and preserving born-digital heritage: “I have focused on trying to find one person who is maybe a level above me and to connect with them and then hopefully build up a network within my institution to build some groundswell.”


Hannah Silverman

Tamar Zeffren

Hannah Silverman and Tamar Zeffren both work at JDC Archives. Tamar is the Archival Collections Manager. Hannah is the Digitization Project Specialist and also works independently as a photo archivist. Both received SAA’s DAS certification.

A Conversation with Wendy Hagenmaier, Digital Collections Archivist at Georgia Tech

Interview conducted with Wendy Hagenmaier by Colleen Farry in March 2019.

This is the sixth post in a new series of conversations between emerging professionals and archivists actively working with digital materials.


Wendy Hagenmaier is the Digital Collections Archivist at the Georgia Tech Library where she leads the development of workflows for preserving and delivering born-digital special collections. She also manages the Library’s retroTECH initiative. Recently, Wendy shared her experiences as an archivist and some recommendations for new professionals with bloggERS!

When Wendy entered graduate school at the University of Texas at Austin, she did not initially know that her area of focus would be archives. She recalled a presentation by Dr. David Gracy during orientation. “I was captivated by the thought of how records are with you from the time that you’re born and how they’re evidence of your life.” Wendy went on to work in the archives as a graduate student while pursuing her M.S. in Information Studies. In retrospect, pursuing a career in archives was a natural career path for Wendy. As a child, she was always fascinated by objects and the narratives that people attached to them. In this way, Wendy explained how “the past is still present within objects in an archive.”

In addition to managing born-digital special collections, Wendy oversees the retroTECH Library program at Georgia Tech. This initiative provides a place for engagement with vintage hardware and software and modern tools for digital archiving and emulation. As described on the program website: “retroTECH aims to inspire a cultural mindset that emphasizes the importance of personal archives, open access to digital heritage, and long-term thinking.” Wendy hopes the program will continue to grow and expand beyond its space in the library. “The students, in interacting with older technology, can consider how we interact with technology now. They begin to consider the infrastructures that define our records and think about their own engagement with technology.”

Visitors to the retroTech lab have the opportunity to experiment with classic hardware and computer programs. “When people walk into the space they become very emotional and immediately launch into a memory of when they were a kid.” She spoke about the power of that experience and its ability to demonstrate the importance of libraries and archives as preservers of the past. Wendy also shared her thoughts on the importance of making archival work more visible and the challenge of developing models of sustainability within the profession. “We need to be able to communicate the value of our work to people in power who make resource decisions.”

When asked about the dynamic nature of digital archiving and staying up to date on new tools and technologies, Wendy acknowledged, “We will continue to encounter skills gaps in our careers.” To tackle new challenges with technology, Wendy has adopted a collaborative approach, working with colleagues to achieve goals that she might not have had bandwidth to accomplish on her own. “I think, ‘If I don’t learn scripting in the way that I had fantasties of, that’s ok.’ I spend time talking with colleagues that have expertise that I wish I had more time to cultivate.” She added, “there are many great SAA courses, and I’m grateful to benefit from these gap-filling learning opportunities.” Wendy also encourages archivists to explore open-source tools with strong user communities and training resources. For her, it is very motivating to be in a profession where “everyone is very open to sharing their knowledge and capitalizing on the ways that we can support each other.”

Some pieces of advice that Wendy shared for new professionals included staying curious and feeling empowered to question. “Try to maintain that sense of wonder and discovery about technological and socio-technical issues, and feel empowered to challenge them, where necessary. Our field is going to change a lot, and we should encourage each other to push beyond the status quo.” She observed that archivists can’t always control how technologies are developed, but they can think critically about how those infrastructures define our records and practices.

Networking can be challenging for new archivists and veterans alike. Wendy recommended pursuing virtual collaborations and reaching out to regional groups with shared interests. “I found comfort and a genuine connection with smaller working groups, like the ERS steering committee.” Wendy has also done a lot of work regionally. “It’s great to get involved locally to identify areas of commonality to present at regional conferences.”

When asked what she loved most about being an archivist, Wendy said the privilege of working with people that have a shared passion for archives. “I do this because I love it, and I get to work with others who love it as well; feeling that shared passion is very nurturing.”


Colleen Farry is an Assistant Professor and Digital Services Librarian at the University of Scranton where she develops, coordinates, and manages the Weinberg Memorial Library’s digital collections and related digital projects.