A Recap of “DAM if you do and DAM if you don’t!”

by Regina Carra

When: December 3, 2018

Where: Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO), New York, NY

Speakers:

  • Stephen Klein, Digital Services Librarian at the CUNY Graduate Center (CUNY)
  • Ashley Blewer, AV Preservation Specialist at Artefactual
  • Kelly Stewart, Digital Preservation Services Manager at Artefactual

On December 3, 2018, the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO)’s Digital Preservation Interest Group hosted an informative (and impeccably titled) presentation about how the CUNY Graduate Center (GC) plans to incorporate Archivematica, a web-based, open-source digital asset management software (DAMs) developed by Artefactual, into its document management strategy for student dissertations. Speakers included Stephen Klein, Digital Services Librarian at the CUNY Graduate Center (GC); Ashley Blewer, AV Preservation Specialist at Artefactual; and Kelly Stewart, Digital Preservation Services Manager at Artefactual. The presentation began with an overview from Stephen about the GC’s needs and why they chose Archivematica as a DAMs, followed by an introduction to and demo of Archivematica and Duracloud, an open-source cloud storage service, led by Ashley and Kelly (who was presenting via video-conference call). While this post provides a general summary of the presentation, I would recommend reaching out to any of the presenters for more detailed information about their work. They were all great!

Every year the GC Library receives between 400-500 dissertations, theses, and capstones. These submissions can include a wide variety of digital materials, from PDF, video, and audio files, to websites and software. Preservation of these materials is essential if the GC is to provide access to emerging scholarship and retain a record of students’ work towards their degrees. Prior to implementing a DAMs, however, the GC’s strategy for managing digital files of student work was focused primarily on access, not preservation. Access copies of student work were available on CUNY Academic Works, a site that uses Bepress Digital Commons as a CMS. Missing from the workflow, however, was the creation, storage, and management of archival originals. As Stephen explained, if the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) model is a guide for a proper digital preservation workflow, the GC was without the middle, Archival Information Package (AIP), portion of it. Some of the qualities that GC liked about Archivematica was that it was open-source and highly-customizable, came with strong customer support from Artefactual, and had an API that could integrate with tools already in use at the library. GC Library staff hope that Archivematica can eventually integrate with both the library’s electronic submission system (Vireo) and CUNY Academic Works, making the submission, preservation, and access of digital dissertations a much more streamlined, automated, and OAIS-compliant process.

A sample of one of Duracloud’s data visualization graphs from the presentation slides.

Next, Ashley and Kelly introduced and demoed Archivematica and Duracloud. I was very pleased to see several features of the Archivematica software that were made intentionally intuitive. The design of the interface is very clean and easily customizable to fit different workflows. Also, each AIP that is processed includes a plain-text, human-readable file which serves as extra documentation explaining what Archivematica did to each file. Artefactual recommends pairing Archivematica with Duracloud, although users can choose to integrate the software with local storage or with other cloud services like those offered by Google or Amazon. One of the features I found really interesting about Duracloud is that it comes with various data visualization graphs that show the user how much storage is available and what materials are taking up the most space.

I close by referencing something Ashley wrote in her recent bloggERS post (conveniently she also contributed to this event). She makes an excellent point about how different skill-sets are needed to do digital preservation, from the developers that create the tools that automate digital archival processes to the archivists that advocate for and implement said tools at their institutions. I think this talk was successful precisely because it included the practitioner and vendor perspectives, as well as the unique expertise that comes with each role. Both are needed if we are to meet the challenges and tap into the potential that digital archives present. I hope to see more of these “meetings of the minds” in the future.

(For more info: Stephen and Ashley and Kelly have generously shared their slides!)


Regina Carra is the Archive Project Metadata and Cataloging Coordinator at Mark Morris Dance Group. She is a recent graduate of the Dual Degree MLS/MA program in Library Science and History at Queens College – CUNY.

Preservation and Access Can Coexist: Implementing Archivematica with Collaborative Working Groups

By Bethany Scott

The University of Houston (UH) Libraries made an institutional commitment in late 2015 to migrate the data for its digitized and born-digital cultural heritage collections to open source systems for preservation and access: Hydra-in-a-Box (now Hyku!), Archivematica, and ArchivesSpace. As a part of that broader initiative, the Digital Preservation Task Force began implementing Archivematica in 2016 for preservation processing and storage.

At the same time, the DAMS Implementation Task Force was also starting to create data models, use cases, and workflows with the goal of ultimately providing access to digital collections via a new online repository to replace CONTENTdm. We decided that this would be a great opportunity to create an end-to-end digital access and preservation workflow for digitized collections, in which digital production tasks could be partially or fully automated and workflow tools could integrate directly with repository/management systems like Archivematica, ArchivesSpace, and the new DAMS. To carry out this work, we created a cross-departmental working group consisting of members from Metadata & Digitization Services, Web Services, and Special Collections.

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Digital Preservation System Integration at the University of Michigan’s Bentley Historical Library

By Michael Shallcross

At SAA 2015, Courtney Mumma (formerly of Artefactual Systems) and I participated in a panel discussion at the Electronic Records Section meeting on “implementing digital preservation tools and systems,” with a focus on “the lessons learned through the planning, development, testing, and production of digital preservation applications.”  

The University of Michigan’s Bentley Historical Library is in the midst of a two-year project (2014-2016) funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to integrate ArchivesSpace, Archivematica, and DSpace in an end-to-end digital archives workflow (for more information on the project itself, see our blog).

Artefactual Systems is responsible for the development work on the project, which has involved adding new functionality to the Archivematica digital preservation system to permit the appraisal and arrangement of digital archives as well as the integration of ArchivesSpace functionality within Archivematica so that users can create and edit archival description in addition to associating digital objects with that information.

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