Securing Our Digital Legacy: An Introduction to the Digital Preservation Coalition

by Sharon McMeekin, Head of Workforce Development


Nineteen years ago, the digital preservation community gathered in York, UK, for the Cedars Project’s Preservation 2000 conference. It was here that the first seeds were sown for what would become the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC). Guided by Neil Beagrie, then of King’s College London and Jisc, work to establish the DPC continued over the next 18 months and, in 2002, representatives from 7 organizations signed the articles that formally constituted the DPC.

In the 17 years since its creation, the DPC has gone from strength to strength, the last 10 years under the leadership of current Executive Director, William Kilbride. The past decade has been a particular period of growth, as shown by the rise in the staff compliment from 2 to 7. We now have more than 90 members who represent an increasingly diverse group of organizations from 12 countries across sectors including cultural heritage, higher education, government, banking, industry, media, research and international bodies.

DPC staff, chair, and president

Our mission at the DPC is to:

[…] enable our members to deliver resilient long-term access to digital content and services, helping them to derive enduring value from digital assets and raising awareness of the strategic, cultural and technological challenges they face.

We work to achieve this through a broad portfolio of work across six strategic areas of activity: Community Engagement, Advocacy, Workforce Development, Capacity Building, Good Practice and Standards, and Management and Governance. Everything we do is member-driven and they guide our activities through the DPC Board, Representative Council, and Sub-Committees which oversee each strategic area.

Although the DPC is driven primarily by the needs of our members, we do also aim to contribute to the broader digital preservation community. As such, many of the resources we develop are made publicly available. In the remainder of this blog post, I’ll be taking a quick look at each of the DPC’s areas of activity and pointing out resources you might find useful.

1 | Community Engagement

First up is our work in the area of Community Engagement. Here our aim is to enable “a growing number of agencies and individuals in all sectors and in all countries to participate in a dynamic and mutually supportive digital preservation community”. Collaboration is a key to digital preservation success, and we hope to encourage and support it by helping build an inclusive and active community. An important step in achieving this aim was the publication of our ‘Inclusion and Diversity Policy’ in 2018.

Webinars are key to building community engagement amongst our members. We invite speakers to talk to our members about particular topics and share experiences through case studies. These webinars are recorded and made available for members to watch at a later date. We also run a monthly ‘Members Lounge’ to allow informal sharing of current work and discussion of issues as they arise and, on the public end of the website, a popular blog, covering case studies, new innovations, thought pieces, recaps of events and more.

2 | Advocacy

Our advocacy work campaigns “for a political and institutional climate more responsive and better informed about the digital preservation challenge”, as well as “raising awareness about the new opportunities that resilient digital assets create”. This tends to happen on several levels, from enabling and aiding members’ advocacy efforts within their own organizations, through raising legislators’ and policy makers’ awareness of digital preservation, to educating the wider populace.

To help those advocating for digital preservation within their own context, we have recently published our Executive Guide. The Guide provides a grab bag of statements and facts to help make the case for digital preservation, including key messages, motivators, opportunities to be gained and risks faced. We welcome any suggestions for additions or changes to this resource!

Our longest running advocacy activity is the biannual Digital Preservation Awards, last held in 2018. The Awards aim to celebrate excellence and innovation in digital preservation across a range of categories. This high-profile event has been joined in recent years by two other activities with a broad remit and engagement. The first is the Bit List of Digitally Endangered Species, which highlights at risk digital information, showing both where preservation work is needed and where efforts have been successful. Finally, there is World Digital Preservation Day (WDPD), a day to showcase digital preservation around the globe. Response to WDPD since its inauguration in 2017 has been exceptionally positive. There’s been tweets, blogs, events, webinars, and even a song and dance! This year WDPD is scheduled for 7th November, and we encourage everyone to get involved.

The nominees, winners, and judges for the 2018 Digital Preservation Awards

3 | Workforce Development

Workforce Development activities at the DPC focus on “providing opportunities for our members to acquire, develop and retain competent and responsive workforces that are ready to address the challenges of digital preservation”. There are many threads to this work, but key for our members are the scholarships we provide through our Career Development Fund and free access to the training courses we run.

At the moment we offer three training courses: ‘Getting Started with Digital Preservation’, ‘Making Progress with Digital Preservation’ and ‘Advocacy for Digital Preservation’, but we have plans to expand the portfolio in the coming year. All of our training courses are available to non-members for a modest fee, but at the moment are mostly held face to face in the UK and Ireland. A move to online training provision is, however, planned for 2020. We are also happy to share training resources and have set up a Slack workspace to enable this and greater collaboration with regards to digital preservation training.

Other resources that may prove helpful that fall under our Workforce Development heading include the ‘Digital Preservation Handbook’, a free online publication covering a digital preservation in the broadest sense. The Handbook aims to be a comprehensive guide for those starting with digital preservation, whilst also offering links additional resources. The content for Handbook was crowd-sourced from experts and has all been peer reviewed. Another useful and slightly less well-known series of publications are our ‘Topical Notes’, originally funded by the National Archives of Ireland, and intended to create resources that introduced key digital preservation issues to a non-specialist audience (particularly record creators). Each note is only two pages long and jargon-free, so a great resource to help raise awareness.

4 | Capacity Building

Perhaps the biggest area of DPC work covers Capacity Building, that is “supporting and assuring our members in the delivery and maintenance of high quality and sustainable digital preservation services through knowledge exchange, technology watch, research and development.” This can take the form of direct member support, helping with tasks such as policy development and procurement, as well as participation in research projects.

Our more advanced publication series, the Technology Watch Reports, also sit below the Capacity Building heading. Written by experts and peer reviewed, each report takes a deeper dive into a particular digital preservation issue. Our latest report on Email Preservation is currently available for member preview but will be publicly released shortly. Some other ‘classics’ include Preserving Social Media, Personal Digital Archiving, and the always popular The Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Reference Model: Introductory Guide (2nd Edition) (I always tell those new to OAIS to start here rather than the 200+ dry pages of the full standard!)

We also run around six thematic Briefing Day events a year on topical issues. As with the training, these are largely held in the UK and Ireland, but they are now also live-streamed for members. We support a number of Thematic Task Forces and Working Groups, with the ‘Web Archiving and Preservation Working Group’ being particularly active at the moment.

DPC members engaged in a brainstorming session

5 | Good Practice and Standards

Our Good Practice and Standards stream of work was a new addition as of the publication of our latest Strategic Plan (2018-22). Here we are contributing work towards “identifying and developing good practice and standards that make digital preservation achievable, supporting efforts to ensure services are tightly matched to shifting requirements.”

We hope this work will allow us to input into standards with the needs of our members in mind and facilitate the sharing of good practice that already happens across the coalition. This has already borne fruit in the shape of the forthcoming DPC Rapid Assessment Model, a maturity model to help with benchmarking digital preservation progress within your organization. You can read a bit more about it in this blog post by Jen Mitcham and the model will be released publicly in late September.

We also work with vendors through our Supporter Program and events like our ‘Digital Futures’ series to help bridge the gap between practice and solutions.

6 | Management and Governance

Our final stream of work is less focused on digital preservation and instead on “ensuring the DPC is a sustainable, competent organization focussed on member needs, providing a robust and trusted platform for collaboration within and beyond the Coalition.” This obviously relates to both the viability of the organization and well as good governance. It is essential that everything we do is transparent and that the members can both direct what we do and ensure accountability.

The Future

Before I depart, I thought I would share a little bit about some of our plans for the future. In the next few years we’ll be taking steps to further internationalize as an organization. At the moment our membership is roughly 75% UK and Ireland and 25% international, but those numbers are gradually moving closer and we hope that continues. With that in mind we will be investigating new ways to deliver services and resources online, as well as in languages beyond English. We’re starting this year with the publication of our prospectus in German, French and Spanish.

We’re also beginning to look forward to our 20th anniversary in 2022. It’s a Digital Preservation Awards Year, so that’s reason enough for a celebration, but we will also be welcoming the digital preservation community to Glasgow, Scotland, as hosts of iPRES 2022. Plans are already afoot for the conference, and we’re excited to make it a showcase for both the community and one of our home cities. Hopefully we’ll see you there, but I encourage you to make use of our resources and to get in touch soon!

Access our Knowledge Base: https://www.dpconline.org/knowledge-base

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Find out how to join us: https://www.dpconline.org/about/join-us


Sharon McMeekin is Head of Workforce Development with the Digital Preservation Coalition and leads on work including training workshops and their scholarship program. She is also Managing Editor of the ‘Digital Preservation Handbook’. With Masters degrees in Information Technology and Information Management and Preservation, both from the University of Glasgow, Sharon is an archivist by training, specializing in digital preservation. She is also an ILM qualified trainer. Before joining the DPC she spent five years as Digital Archivist with RCAHMS. As an invited speaker, Sharon presents on digital preservation at a wide variety of training events, conferences and university courses.

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