Meet the 2018 Candidates: Scott Kirycki

The 2018 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! To support your getting to know the candidates, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2018 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2018 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open through July 17!

Candidate name: Scott Kirycki

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

My journey to becoming an archivist began somewhere that did not, strictly speaking, exist: the fictional worlds of radio programs from the 1940s. When I was a boy, a local radio station replayed old shows such as The Lone Ranger, The Shadow, and The Jack Benny Program. The shows pulled me in with their appeal to the imagination, and I wanted to learn more about them. My parents and teachers had taught me well about the library, and my interest in radio programs (and soon my interest in the historical period that produced them) provided a new focus for the use of library resources. I checked out books, records, and tapes and studied the non-circulating reference material. Later, as I worked on more research projects for school assignments, I learned how to use The Reader’s Guide to Periodical Literature, and that led me to the treasures contained in bound volumes of magazines and on microfilm.

After starting college and choosing English as my major, I spent more time in libraries, particularly academic libraries with their special collections and emphasis on research. I grew to enjoy the research part of college work especially, which prompted me to pursue a master’s in English literature. When the time came for me to do a thesis for my degree, I picked a bibliographic research project over a literary interpretation or analysis. I created an annotated bibliography of the books advertised in The Tatler, an eighteenth-century British periodical.

Given my interest in research and the amount of time I spent in libraries, I considered following my master’s in English with a degree in library science. Since I liked historical material, I thought of studying to work in an archive. Although I looked into applying at some schools of library science, I was not wholeheartedly enthusiastic about additional years of schooling at that point in my life, so my journey took a turn to the business world.

The company where I began working after grad school turned out to be a good fit for me. The work connected to my interest in research because it involved making computerized databases for lawyers. I learned about database software, indexing, document scanning, and some electronic records management. In time, I became a department manager and later moved to project management. Regrettably for me, the company was eventually sold, and the new owners started a course of restructuring that culminated with the elimination of my position.

After exploring the job market, I reached the conclusion that further education would be a rewarding pursuit – rewarding not just from the standpoint of increasing the likelihood of landing a job, but also rewarding for personal growth and the opportunity to learn from other people. Because I had considered library science before and still had an interest in the things of the past, I decided to return to school to earn a degree in library science with a focus on archives. I was drawn to courses on digital content where I could continue to use and build on the experience and data-handling skills that I gained during my first career.

Though my decision to become an archivist was a long time coming, I am glad to have made it and look forward to continuing to discover the rewards of working in a field where I can benefit others by helping them connect to information.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

As I have been working on projects with the Records Management Team at the University of Notre Dame, I have become increasingly aware of how many electronic records consist of data points in enterprise-size content management systems rather than discrete files such as Word docs and PDFs. I anticipate that archiving databases as well as material from systems that were not necessarily designed with long-term preservation in mind will be a growing challenge for archivists. I would like to see the Electronic Records Section put forward guidance on best practices for meeting this challenge.

What cartoon character do you model yourself after?

The Tick (from the 1994 – 1996 Fox animated series)

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Meet the 2018 Candidates: Kelsey O’Connell

The 2018 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! To support your getting to know the candidates, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2018 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2018 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open through July 17!

Candidate name: Kelsey O’Connell

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

As a history/English major in college, I knew I didn’t want to become a teacher or a lawyer so I began exploring other career options. I landed a position as a student assistant in my college library’s Special Collections and Archives department where I began processing collections. I immediately loved the organization, research, and learning that I participated in daily and realized I just wanted to do this for the rest of my life.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

My primary interest is employing ERS’s platform to influence SAA and related organizations to begin creating and formalizing documentation for electronic records. We all talk about documentation a lot, but we still haven’t rolled them out. I think a strategic approach to initiating much of this documentation is for ERS to survey, index, and prioritize various policies, guidelines, standards, and frameworks needed to have robust documentation on the management and care of electronic records. We’d be able to utilize Section members’ input and participation in the discussion, allowing us to have a comprehensive yet diverse perspective for our recommendations.

What cartoon character do you model yourself after?

I have to admit I had to ask my family and friends for help identifying this one. More than a few of them said Velma from Scooby Doo. I laughed because I assumed it was because I really can’t see without my glasses – like when my cat enjoys knocking them off my nightstand in the middle of the night and I have to search for them in the morning. But they all said it’s because I like figuring stuff out. Although mystery isn’t my favorite genre, there are some clear parallels to researching and employing some trial and error tactics with electronic records.

Meet the 2018 Candidates: Jane Kelly

The 2018 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! To support your getting to know the candidates, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2018 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2018 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open through July 17!

Candidate name: Jane Kelly

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

My first contact with archives was as a college intern. The position was unpaid, required an expensive ninety minute commute each way, and wasn’t exactly thrilling. I spent most of that job with my headphones in, dusting red rot off of books, waiting to go home. This was not my dream job. It wasn’t until several years after I finished college that I found myself truly engaged with archives as a career path. I studied history as an undergrad but chose not to pursue a PhD, so I was happy to find myself in a job where understanding the past really matters. I began to appreciate the ways in which archives and archivists construct narratives of the past in their everyday work. For better or worse, there’s a lot of power in what we do. More importantly, it was the people I worked with who made me want to become an archivist. Having coworkers who took the time to teach me on the job, especially before I started grad school, has been invaluable. Working with people who encouraged me to attend conferences, grapple with big questions, and take on responsibility made me want to keep working and learning. Without that, I’m not sure that I would have stuck around.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

I would love to see the Electronic Records Section become an even greater resource for other SAA sections. It seems inevitable that everyone who works in archives will need to understand electronic records and born-digital material, at least at a basic level. ERS seems like the obvious hub for those resources. I want other archivists to see that they are capable of understanding issues unique to electronic records and that they don’t need to be intimidated by this part of the field. As a young professional, I’m also particularly interested in partnering with SNAP. Access to mentorship has been really important for me, both in terms of choosing to stay in the archives profession and learning how to do the work. I would like to see deeper connections between these two groups and find ways to support folks who don’t have resources to pay for SAA courses to supplement what they learn in graduate school.

What cartoon character do you model yourself after?

This is a hard question. I’ll go with Eliza Thornberry because she’s a smart kid, and I also wish I could talk to my cat.

Meet the 2018 Candidates: Susan Malsbury

The 2018 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! To support your getting to know the candidates, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2018 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2018 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open through July 17!

Candidate name: Susan Malsbury

Running for: Vice-Chair / Chair-Elect

What made you want to become an archivist?

When I was initially applying to library schools, I wanted to be sure that I was choosing the right career path. To that end, I volunteered at the Portland Public Library and the Maine Historical Society, both in Portland, Maine. While I enjoyed my time at the public library, I immediately fell in love with the archival work at the historical society. My project there was helping an archivist process the Portland Press Herald glass plate negative collection and scan select negatives for inclusion in the Maine Memory Network. It was magic seeing all these early-20th century images unwrapped from their cracked, yellowed envelopes and reintroduced to the world after so many years via description and scanning. It was extremely fulfilling to help preserve the negatives for future researchers. I returned to New York City and was fortunate enough to get a job in the Manuscripts and Archives Division at the New York Public Library. I was able to supplement my graduate work with hands-on experience processing some truly incredible collections such as the 1939/1940 New York World’s Fair papers and the Truman Capote papers. While digital archives are a far cry from glass plate negatives, I feel a similar fulfillment knowing that I’m helping ensure the preservation and future accessibility of unique born-digital records.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

There are a lot of exciting initiatives, programs, and ad hoc groups developing in the digital archives and digital preservation communities. I would love for ERS to build on its mandate to be the locus of expertise for SAA by serving as a platform for these projects to reach SAA’s general membership. Additionally, I’d like to work to expand participation as an ever-greater number of archivists are working with born-digital material (even if “digital” isn’t in their job title).

What cartoon character do you model yourself after?

As a child of the ‘90s I’ve always strongly identified with Lisa Simpson.

Get to know the candidates: Lora Davis

The 2016 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! Over the next two weeks, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2016 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2016 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open July 8 through the 22!

Candidate name: Lora Davis

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

This question assumes a discrete “Aha!” moment, which, for me at least, never really happened. I like to say that archives found me, and not the other way around. I was first exposed to the archives (the place, if not the profession) when, as a 17-year-old undergraduate at Susquehanna University, I was awarded a university assistantship that placed me in the employ of a long-serving member of the Department of History, who had undertaken to write the history of the university. Following a brief tour (“My Moody Blues cassettes are in this drawer here, feel free to listen!”) and with a copy of James O’Toole’s Understanding Archives and Manuscripts (1990) in hand, I set about processing the papers of two former university presidents. Seven years later, after completing a master’s in history and opting to leave my PhD program, the archives (this time both place and profession) found me again when the Manuscripts Unit of the University of Delaware Library’s Special Collections department decided to take a chance and employ a grad school dropout at the height of the 2008 economic collapse. This time I was hooked for good. I went on to earn my MLIS online while working my full-time paraprofessional position at Delaware, and have since held professional positions at Colgate University and Johns Hopkins University. It took me a little while to figure it out, but, being an archivist provided me with the balance and variety of work I’d been longing for – the theory and intellectual work of a scholar, the interaction with people I’d missed as a graduate student researcher, the connection to history that had driven my prior coursework, and, perhaps most of all, the exposure to and engagement with emerging technologies I’d missed as a computer hobbyist turned grad student.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

Above all, I would like to see the Electronic Records Section serve as a welcoming and valuable resource to *all* archivists. In my career I have worked at a medium-sized partially public-funded university, a small liberal arts college, and a private research university, and worked on paper-based and electronic manuscript and university records’ collections, so I appreciate the variety of funding models, resource levels, institutional priorities, and individual knowledge and time we must all strive to balance and leverage in our day-to-day work. Across the profession it is still rare for someone to have the luxury of focusing day in and day out on electronic records; however, it is by no means rare for a 21st century archivist to encounter records of enduring value that exist only in digital form. By striving to be an open, welcoming, responsive, and member-driven community resource for all archivists, the Electronic Records Section can help meet the daily operational needs of its members (e.g. demystifying electronic records jargon and workflows, providing case studies of both successes and failures, serving as a non-judgmental sounding board for new and experienced archivists alike), while also helping to propel the profession forward.

What is your favorite GIF?

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Get to know the candidates: Brian Dietz

The 2016 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! Over the next two weeks, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2016 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2016 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open July 8 through the 22!

Candidate name: Brian Dietz

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

All current contexts–social, cultural, economic–are historically contingent. We examine those contingencies, often with the goal of exposing power dynamics, through historical inquiry. Support such critical work is what excited me about becoming an archivist.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

I’m really interested in the idea of more of us making our documentation widely available so that it becomes a little bit easier for some folks to start digital archiving programs and others to enhance existing ones. The ERS could lead an effort around this kind of sharing.

What is your favorite GIF?

I love how affirming this one is:

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Get to know the candidates: Blake Graham

The 2016 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! Over the next two weeks, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2016 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2016 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open July 8 through the 22!

Candidate name: Blake Graham

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

I love being asked this question. I started my career working as a graduate assistant at a university archives about six years ago. At the time, I was knee-deep in the curriculum – studying southern identity and slavery. I was enchanted by historiography, and discovering how historians debate about the interpretation, nature, and implication of primary source materials. My coursework, as well as my job responsibilities, were related to southern history. While working at the university archives, arranging a nineteenth-century manuscript collection, I stumbled across a slave pamphlet. For anyone unfamiliar, these were handouts for slave-trading events in the antebellum South. The text and imagery included horrific details about physique and “background information” on slaves. I buckled after reading the pamphlet. Handling and reading this document was a powerful experience for me, to say the least. I brought the item to the director, and she broke down crying as well. Because of this, along with a long-list of “encounters in the archives,” I have a better understanding of the power of the written record. My work allows me to continue exploring the relationship between the written record and the human experience. This is why I work in archives, and why I love my work.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

I admire and appreciate all of the work in BloggERS – I believe it is a gateway for collaboration and innovation among our professional communities. If I was asked about foreseeable goals and accomplishments, I would take a bet on ERS leaders proactively seeking different voices to participate in the blog. In 2015-2016, roughly 80% of authors and ERM discussions on BloggERS come from university settings – a percentage that is also reflective of the Section’s leadership. To revisit Kyle Henke’s “Get to Know You” post last year, “I see the purpose of this group as a method to facilitate communication and encourage collaboration across the profession.” I also believe one of the best ways to learn how to improve one’s knowledge of, or develop new skills in, a topic of interest is to simply talk about it with colleagues across the profession. I would like to help move BloggERS in this direction by proactively initiating a dialogue between professionals working in a wide range of settings. I think targeted outreach and education is one of the ways we can accomplish collaboration across the profession.

What is your favorite GIF?

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Get to know the candidates: Brad Houston

The 2016 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! Over the next two weeks, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2016 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2016 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open July 8 through the 22!

Candidate name: Brad Houston

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

A combination of two things: 1) A summer internship with the Truman Presidential Library, which introduced me to the work of an archivist and made me realize that said work was something I could see myself doing. 2) My subsequent experience researching for my senior History thesis, much of which took place in small town historical societies and other poorly-described and poorly organized repositories. This experience elicited a vow: “I want to help make sure other people don’t have to work this hard to find what they’re looking for.” (I hope I’ve been doing a good job on both the description and reference sides of this!)

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

While chair of the Records Management Roundtable, I helped institute a semi-regular series of Google Hangouts, which give our members a chance to hear about archival and records management issues from various experts in the field and interact in real-time to ask questions or work through examples. I think this is a model that would work well with a lot of the content put out by ERS– Hangout facilitators could walk people through using a particular tool or workflow as discussed previously on the blog, for example. The hangout format offers more interactivity than a webinar or Twitter chat (though incorporating elements of both!) and it seems like a great opportunity to expand ERS’s educational engagement with its members.

What is your favorite GIF?

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Get to know the candidates: Dorothy Waugh

The 2016 elections for Electronic Records Section leadership are upon us! Over the next two weeks, we will be presenting additional information provided by the 2016 nominees for ERS leadership positions. For more information about the slate of candidates, you can check out the full 2016 ERS elections site. ERS Members: be sure to vote! Polls are open July 8 through the 22!

Candidate name: Dorothy Waugh

Running for: Steering Committee

What made you decide you wanted to become an archivist?

The glamour.

What is one thing you’d like to see the Electronic Records Section accomplish during your time on the steering committee?

I’m excited about the many opportunities for a group like the Electronic Records Section to engage practitioners working in this dynamic and fast-paced field. To give just one example, I’ve been really impressed by the Section’s development of bloggERS! during the past couple of years. The site has fast become a go-to resource in which to share ideas, address challenges, and celebrate successes. Should I be elected to the steering committee, I would be keen to support the ongoing growth of the Blog as the online hub of the ERS community. Taking a lead from what’s already been achieved, I’d like to build out the types of content that we provide and encourage active participation from both members of ERS and our close colleagues—I’d love to invite contributions from researchers who are using born-digital materials, for instance. In particular, I’m interested in identifying content that is not available elsewhere. I’ve always thought, for example, that the informal nature of a Blog makes it the ideal venue for a regular “It Didn’t Work” column, focusing on real-life examples of failure in digital archives and inviting collaborative (and good-natured!) problem-solving. If elected to the ERS steering committee, I’d like to build on the momentum of the work already underway and help the Blog become a forum for discussion, a home for shared resources, and a welcoming and inclusive space in which to ask questions and work towards solutions.

What is your favorite GIF?

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Electronic Records Section call for nominations

Election season is fast approaching, and the Electronic Records Section has some exciting opportunities for service, both in elected and appointed positions!

The ERS needs to elect a new Vice Chair/Chair Elect and 2 Steering Committee members. We are also looking for a volunteer to serve as Communications Liaison. All nominations must be received by June 1st!

Vice Chair/Chair Elect (1 position open)

The Vice Chair serves a 1-year term beginning immediately following the 2016 Annual Meeting. Their responsibilities are to assist the Chair in leading the section and representing the section in the absence of the Chair. Upon completion of the Vice Chair’s term, the Vice Chair assumes the position of Chair, at the conclusion of the incumbent Chair’s term. Upon completion of the 1-year term as Chair, he/she serves one final year as Past Chair.

Steering Committee (2 positions open)

Steering Committee members serve for a term of 3 years, beginning immediately following the 2016 Annual Meeting. Their responsibility is to assist the Chair and the Vice Chair in leading and organizing section activities.

Communication Liaison (1 position open)

The Communications Liaison facilitates communications between the Steering Committee and the Section membership and other audiences, including but not limited to the SAA microsite, electronic mailing list, blogs, social media, and other forms of online communication not yet in use by the Section. This role is open to all eligible Electronic Records Section members. The appointee will serve a renewable one-year term. Note that this role is appointed and not subject to election.

How can I nominate someone?

To nominate yourself or someone else, or to volunteer for appointment as Communication Liaison,  please send to Marty Gengenbach (martin[dot]gengenbach[at]gmail[dot]com):

  • the nominee/volunteer name,
  • contact information, and
  • position (Vice Chair/Chair Elect, Steering Committee, or Communication Liaison)

Important dates:

June 1All nominations must be received by this date. The steering committee will review and confirm nominations the following week.

June 15 – Candidate statements due.

July 1 – Supplemental information such as candidate photos or biographies due.

For more information on Electronic Records Section leadership, please see the ERS section bylaws.