There’s a First Time for Everything

By Valencia Johnson

This is the fourth post in the bloggERS series on Archiving Digital Communication.


This summer I had the pleasure of accessioning a large digital collection from a retiring staff member. Due to their longevity with the institution, the creator had amassed an extensive digital record. In addition to their desktop files, the archive collected an archival Outlook .pst file of 15.8 GB! This was my first time working with emails. This was also the first time some of the tools discussed below were used in the workflow at my institution. As a newcomer to the digital archiving community, I would like to share this case study and my first impressions on the tools I used in this acquisition.

My original workflow:

  1. Convert the .pst file into an .mbox file.
  2. Place both files in a folder titled Emails and add this folder to the acquisition folder that contains the Desktop files folder. This way the digital records can be accessioned as one unit.
  3. Follow and complete our accessioning procedures.

Things were moving smoothly; I was able to use Emailchemy, a tool that converts email from closed, proprietary file formats, such as .pst files used by Outlook, to standard, portable formats that any application can use, such as .mbox files, which can be read using Thunderbird, Mozilla’s open source email client. I used a Windows laptop that had Outlook and Thunderbird installed to complete this task. I had no issues with Emailchemy, the instructions in the owner’s manual were clear, and the process was easy. Next, I uploaded the Email folder, which contained the .pst and .mbox files, to the acquisition external hard drive and began processing with BitCurator. The machine I used to accession is a FRED, a powerful forensic recovery tool used by law enforcement and some archivists. Our FRED runs BitCurator, which is a Linux environment. This is an important fact to remember because .pst files will not open on a Linux machine.

At Princeton, we use Bulk Extractor to check for Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and credit card numbers. This is step 6 in our workflow and this is where I ran into some issues.

Yeah Bulk Extractor I’ll just pick up more cores during lunch.

The program was unable to complete 4 threads within the Email folder and timed out. The picture above is part of the explanation message I received. In my understanding and research, aka Google because I did not understand the message, the program was unable to completely execute the task with the amount of processing power available. So the message is essentially saying “I don’t know why this is taking so long. It’s you not me. You need a better computer.” From the initial scan results, I was able to remove PII from the Desktop folder. So instead of running the scan on the entire acquisition folder, I ran the scan solely on the Email folder and the scan still timed out. Despite the incomplete scan, I moved on with the results I had.  

I tried to make sense of the reports Bulk Extractor created for the email files. The Bulk Extractor output includes a full file path for each file flagged, e.g. (/home/user/Desktop/blogERs/Email.docx). This is how I was able locate files within the Desktop folder. The output for the Email folder looked like this:

(Some text has been blacked out for privacy.)

Even though Bulk Extractor Viewer does display the content, it displays it like a text editor, e.g. Notepad, with all the coding alongside the content of the message, not as an email, because all the results were from the .mbox file. This is just the format .mbox generates without an email client. This coding can be difficult to interpret without an email client to translate the material into a human readable format. This output makes it hard to locate an individual message within a .pst because it is hard but not impossible to find the date or title of the email amongst the coding. But this was my first time encountering results like this and it freaked me out a bit.

Because regular expressions, the search method used by Bulk Extractor, looks for number patterns, some of the hits were false positives, number strings that matched the pattern of SSN or credit card numbers. So in lieu of social security numbers, I found the results were FedEx tracking numbers or mistyped phone numbers, though to be fair mistyped numbers are someone’s SSN. For credit card numbers, the program picked up email coding and non-financially related number patterns.

The scan found a SSN I had to remove from the .pst and the .mbox. Remember .pst files only work with Microsoft Outlook. At this point in processing, I was on a Linux machine and could not open the .pst so I focused on the .mbox.  Using the flagged terms, I thought maybe I could use a keyword search within the .mbox to locate and remove the flagged material because you can open .mbox files using a text editor. Remember when I said the .pst was over 15 GB? Well the .mbox was just as large and this caused the text editor to stall and eventually give up opening the file. Despite these challenges, I remained steadfast and found UltraEdit, a large text file editor. This whole process took a couple of days and in the end the results from Bulk Extractor’s search indicated the email files contained one SSN and no credit card numbers.  

While discussing my difficulties with my supervisor, she suggested trying FileLocator Pro, a scanner like Bulk Extractor that was created with .pst files in mind, to fulfill our due diligence to look for sensitive information since the Bulk Extractor scan timed out before finishing.  Though FileLocator Pro operates on Windows so, unfortunately, we couldn’t do the scan on the FRED,  FileLocator Pro was able to catch real SSNs hidden in attachments that did not appear in the Bulk Extractor results.

I was able to view the email with the flagged content highlighted within FileLocator Pro like Bulk Extractor. Also, there is the option to open the attachments or emails in their respective programs. So a .pdf file opened in Adobe and the email messages opened in Outlook. Even though I had false positives with FileLocator Pro, verifying the content was easy. It didn’t perform as well searching for credit card numbers; I had some error messages stating that some attached files contained no readable text or that FileLocator Pro had to use a raw data search instead of the primary method. These errors were limited to attachments with .gif, .doc, .pdf, and .xls extensions. But overall it was a shorter and better experience working with FileLocator Pro, at least when it comes to email files.

As emails continue to dominate how we communicate at work and in our personal lives, archivists and electronic records managers can expect to process even larger files, despite how long an individual stays at an institution. Larger files can make the hunt for PII and other sensitive data feel like searching for a needle in a haystack, especially when our scanners are unable to flag individual emails, attachments, or even complete a scan. There’s no such thing as a perfect program; I like Bulk Extractor for non-email files, and I have concerns with FileLocator Pro. However, technology continues to improve and with forums like this blog we can learn from one another.


Valencia Johnson is the Digital Accessioning Assistant for the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library at Princeton University. She is a certified archivist with an MA in Museum Studies from Baylor University.

Advertisements

Adventures in Email Wrangling: TAMU-CC’s ePADD Story

By Alston Cobourn

This is the first post in the bloggERS series on Archiving Digital Communication.

Getting Started

Soon after I arrived at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi in January 2017 as the university’s first Processing and Digital Assets Archivist, two high-level longtime employees retired or switched positions. Therefore, I fast-tracked an effort to begin collecting selected email records because these employees undoubtedly had some correspondence of long-term significance, which was also governed by the Texas A&M System’s records retention schedules.

I began by testing ePADD, software used to conduct various archival processes on email, on small date ranges of my work email account.  I ultimately decided to begin using it on selected campus email because I found it relatively easy to use, it includes some helpful appraisal tools, and it provides an interface for patrons to view and select records of which they want a copy. Since the emails themselves live as MBOX files in folders outside of the software, and are viewable with a text editor, I felt comfortable that using ePADD meant not risking the loss of important records. I installed ePADD on my laptop with the thought that traveling to the employees would make the process of transferring their email easier and encourage cooperation.

Transferring the email

In June 2017, I used ePADD Version 3.1 to collect the email of the two employees.  My department head shared general information and arranged an appointment with the employees’ current administrative assistant or interim replacement as applicable. She also made a request to campus IT that they keep the account of the retired employee open.  IT granted the interim replacement access to the account.

I then traveled to the employees’ offices where they entered the appropriate credentials for the university email account into ePADD, identified which folders were most likely to contain records of long-term historical value, and verified the date range I needed to capture.  Then we waited.

In one instance, I had to leave my laptop running in the person’s office overnight because I needed to maintain a consistent internet connection during ePADD’s approximately eight hours of harvesting and the office was off-campus.  I had not remembered to bring a power cord, but thankfully my laptop was fully charged.

Successes

Our main success—we were actually able to collect some records!  Obvious, yes, but I state it because it was the first time TAMU-CC has ever collected this record format and the email of the departed employee was almost deactivated before we sent our preservation request to IT. Second, my department head and I have started conversations with important players on campus about the ethical and legal reasons why the archives needs to review email before disposal.

Challenges

In both cases, the employee had deleted a significant number of emails before we were able to capture their account and had used their work account for personal email.  These behaviors confirmed what we all already knew–employees are largely unaware that their email is an official record. Therefore, we plan to increase efforts to educate faculty and staff about this fact, their responsibilities, and best practices for organizing their email.  The external conversations we have had so far are an important start.

ePADD enabled me to combat the personal email complication by systematically deleting all emails from specific individual senders in batch. I took this approach for family members, listservs, and notifications from various personal accounts.

The feature that recognizes sensitive information worked well in identifying messages that contained social security numbers. However, it did not flag messages that contained phone numbers, which we also consider sensitive personal information. Additionally, in-message redaction is not possible in 3.1.

For messages I have marked as restricted, I have chosen to add an annotation as well that specifies the reason for the restriction. This will enable me to manage those emails at a more granular level. This approach was a modification of a suggestion by fellow archivists at Duke University.

Conclusion

Currently, the email is living on a networked drive while we establish an Amazon S3 account and an Archivematica instance. We plan to provide access to email in our reading room via the ePADD delivery module and publicize this access via finding aids. Overall ePADD is a positive step forward for TAMU-CC.

Note from the Author:

Since writing this post, I have learned that it is possible in ePADD to use regular expressions to further aid in identifying potentially sensitive materials.  By default the program uses regular expressions to find social security numbers, but it can be configured to find other personal information such as credit card numbers and phone numbers.  Further guidance is provided in the Reviewing Regular Expressions section of the ePADD User Guide.

 

ABCheadshotAlston Cobourn is the Processing and Digital Assets Archivist at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi where she leads the library’s digital preservation efforts. Previously she was the Digital Scholarship Librarian at Washington and Lee University. She holds a BA and MLS with an Archives and Records Management concentration from UNC-Chapel Hill.

OSS4Pres 2.0: Developing functional requirements/features for digital preservation tools

By Heidi Elaine Kelly

____

This is the final post in the bloggERS series describing outcomes of the #OSS4Pres 2.0 workshop at iPRES 2016, addressing open source tool and software development for digital preservation. This post outlines the work of the group tasked with “ developing functional requirements/features for OSS tools the community would like to see built/developed (e.g. tools that could be used during ‘pre-ingest’ stage).” 

The Functional Requirements for New Tools and Features Group of the OSS4Pres workshop aimed to write user stories focused on new features that developers can build out to better support digital preservation and archives work. The group was largely comprised of practitioners who work with digital curation tools regularly, and was facilitated by Carl Wilson of the Open Preservation Foundation. While their work largely involved writing user stories for development, the group also came up with requirement lists for specific areas of tool development, outlined below. We hope that these lists help continue to bridge the gap between digital preservation professionals and open source developers by providing a deeper perspective of user needs.

Basic Requirements for Tools:

  • Mostly needed for Mac environment
  • No software installation on donor computer
  • No software dependencies requiring installation (e.g., Java)
  • Must be GUI-based, as most archivists are not skilled with the command line
  • Graceful failure

Descriptive Metadata Extraction Needs (using Apache Tika):

  • Archival date
  • Author
  • Authorship location
  • Subject location
  • Subject
  • Document type
  • Removal of spelling errors to improve extracted text

Technical Metadata Extraction Needs:

  • All datetime information available should be retained (minimum of LastModified Date)
  • Technical manifest report
  • File permissions and file ownership permissions
  • Information about the tool that generated the technical manifest report:
    • tool – name of the tool used to gather the disk image
    • tool version – the version of the tool
    • signature version – if the tool uses ‘signatures’ or other add-ons, e.g. which virus scanner software signature – such as signature release July 2014 or v84
    • datetime process run – the datetime information of when the process ran (usually tools will give you when the process was completed) – for each tool that you use

Data Transfer Tool Requirements:

  • Run from portable external device
  • Bag-It standard compliant (build into a “bag”)
  • Able to select a subset of data – not disk image the whole computer
  • GUI-based tool
  • Original file name (also retained in tech manifest)
  • Original file path (also retained in tech manifest)
  • Directory structure (also retained in tech manifest)
  • Address these issues in filenames (record the actual filename in the tech manifest): Diacritics (e.g. naïve ), Illegal characters ( \ / : * ? “ < > | ), Spaces, M-dashes, n-dashes, Missing file extensions, Excessively long file and folder names, etc
  • Possibly able to connect to “your” FTP site/cloud thingy and send the data there when ready for transfer

Checksum Verification Requirements:

  • File-by-file checksum hash generation
  • Ability to validate the contents of the transfer

Reporting Requirements:

  • Ability to highlight/report on possibly problematic files/folders in a separate file

Testing Requirements:

  • Access to a test corpora, with known issues, to test tool

Smart Selection & Appraisal Tool Requirements:

  • DRM/TPMs detection
  • Regular expressions/fuzzy logic for finding certain terms – e.g. phone numbers, security numbers, other predefined personal data
  • Blacklisting of files – configurable list of blacklist terms
  • Shortlisting a set of “questionable” files based on parameters that could then be flagged for a human to do further QA/QC

Specific Features Needed by the Community:

  • Gathering/generating quantitative metrics for web harvests
  • Mitigation strategies for FFMPEG obsolescence
  • TESSERACT language functionality

____

heidi-elaine-kellyHeidi Elaine Kelly is the Digital Preservation Librarian at Indiana University, where she is responsible for building out the infrastructure to support long-term sustainability of digital content. Previously she was a DiXiT fellow at Huygens ING and an NDSR fellow at the Library of Congress.

OSS4Pres 2.0: Sharing is Caring: Developing an online community space for sharing workflows

By Sam Meister

____

This is the third post in the bloggERS series describing outcomes of the #OSS4Pres 2.0 workshop at iPRES 2016, addressing open source tool and software development for digital preservation. This post outlines the work of the group tasked with “developing requirements for an online community space for sharing workflows, OSS tool integrations, and implementation experiences” See our other posts for information on the groups that focused on feature development and design requirements for FOSS tools.

Cultural heritage institutions, from small museums to large academic libraries, have made significant progress developing and implementing workflows to manage local digital curation and preservation activities. Many institutions are at different stages in the maturity of these workflows. Some are just getting started, and others have had established workflows for many years. Documentation assists institutions in representing current practices and functions as a benchmark for future organizational decision-making and improvements. Additionally, sharing documentation assists in creating cross-institutional understanding of digital curation and preservation activities and can facilitate collaborations amongst institutions around shared needs.

One of the most commonly voiced recommendations from iPRES 2015 OSS4PRES workshop attendees was the desire for a centralized location for technical and instructional documentation, end-to-end workflows, case studies, and other resources related to the installation, implementation, and use of OSS tools. This resource could serve as a hub that would enable practitioners to freely and openly exchange information, user requirements, and anecdotal accounts of OSS initiatives and implementations.

At the OSS4Pres 2.0 workshop, the group of folks looking at developing an online space for sharing workflows and implementation experience started by defining a simple goal and deliverable for the two hour session:

Develop a list of minimal levels of content that should be included in an open online community space for sharing workflows and other documentation

The group the began a discussion on developing this list of minimal levels by thinking about the potential value of user stories in informing these levels. We spent a bit of time proposing a short list of user stories, just enough to provide some insight into the basic structures that would be needed for sharing workflow documentation.

User stories

  • I am using tool 1 and tool 2 and want to know how others have joined them together into a workflow
  • I have a certain type of data to preserve and want to see what workflows other institutions have in place to preserve this data
  • There is a gap in my workflow — a function that we are not carrying out — and I want to see how others have filled this gap
  • I am starting from scratch and need to see some example workflows for inspiration
  • I would like to document my workflow and want to find out how to do this in a way that is useful for others
  • I would like to know why people are using particular tools – is there evidence that they tried another tool, for example, that wasn’t successful?

The group then proceeded to define a workflow object as a series of workflow steps with its own attributes, a visual representation, and organizational context:

Workflow step
Title / name
Description
Tools / resources
Position / role

Visual workflow diagrams / model
Organizational Context
            Institution type
            Content type

Next, we started to draft out the different elements that would be part of an initial minimal level for workflow objects:

Level 1:

Title
Description
Institution / organization type
Contact
Content type(s)
Status
Link to external resources
Download workflow diagram objects
Workflow concerns / reflections / gaps

After this effort the group focused on discussing next steps and how an online community space for sharing workflows could be realized. This discuss led towards pursuing the expansion of COPTR to support sharing of workflow documentation. We outlined a roadmap for next steps toward pursuing this goal:

  • Propose / approach COPTR steering group on adding workflows space to COPTR
  • Develop home page and workflow template
  • Add examples
  • Group review
  • Promote / launch
  • Evaluation

The group has continued this work post-workshop and has made good progress setting up a Community Owned Workflows section to COPTR and developing an initial workflow template. We are in the midst of creating and evaluating sample workflows to help with revising and tweaking as needed. Based on this process we hope to launch and start promoting this new online space for sharing workflows in the months ahead. So stay tuned!

____

meister_photoSam Meister is the Preservation Communities Manager, working with the MetaArchive Cooperative and BitCurator Consortium communities. Previously, he worked as Digital Archivist and Assistant Professor at the University of Montana. Sam holds a Master of Library and Information Science degree from San Jose State University and a B.A. in Visual Arts from the University of California San Diego. Sam is also an Instructor in the Library of Congress Digital Preservation Education and Outreach Program.

 

OSS4Pres 2.0: Design Requirements for Better Open Source Tools

By Heidi Elaine Kelly

____

This is the second post in the bloggERS series describing outcomes of the #OSS4Pres 2.0 workshop at iPRES 2016, addressing open source tool and software development for digital preservation. This post outlines the work of the group tasked with “drafting a design guide and requirements for Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) tools, to ensure that they integrate easily with digital preservation institutional systems and processes.” 

The FOSS Development Requirements Group set out to create a design guide for FOSS tools to ensure easier adoption of open-source tools by the digital preservation community, including their integration with common end-to-end software and tools supporting digital preservation and access that are now in use by that community. 

The group included representatives of large digital preservation and access projects such as Fedora and Archivematica, as well as tool developers and practitioners, ensuring a range of perspectives were represented. The group’s initial discussion led to the creation of a list of minimum necessary requirements for developing open source tools for digital preservation, based on similar examples from the Open Preservation Foundation (OPF) and from other fields. Below is the draft list that the group came up with, followed by some intended future steps. We welcome feedback or additions to the list, as well as suggestions for where such a list might be hosted long term.

Minimum Necessary Requirements for FOSS Digital Preservation Tool Development

Necessities

  • Provide publicly accessible documentation and an issue tracker
  • Have a documented process for how people can contribute to development, report bugs, and suggest new documentation
  • Every tool should do the smallest possible task really well; if you are developing an end-to-end system, develop it in a modular way in keeping with this principle
  • Follow established standards and practices for development and use of the tool
  • Keep documentation up-to-date and versioned
  • Follow test-driven development philosophy
  • Don’t develop a tool without use cases, and stakeholders willing to validate those use cases
  • Use an open and permissive software license to allow for integrations and broader use

Recommendations

  • Have a mailing list, Slack or IRC channel, or other means for community interaction
  • Establish community guidelines
  • Provide a well-documented mechanism for integration with other tools/systems in different languages
  • Provide functionality of tool as a library, separating out the GUI and the actual functions
  • Package tool in an easy-to-use way; the more broadly you want the tool to be used, package it for different operating systems
  • Use a packaging format that supports any dependencies
  • Provide examples of functionality for potential users
  • Consider the organizational home or archive for the tool for long-term sustainability; develop your tool based on potential organizations’ guidelines
  • Consider providing a mechanism for internationalization of your tool (this is a broader community need as well, to identify the tools that exist and to incentivize this)

Premise

  • Digital preservation is an operating system-agnostic field

Next Steps

Feedback and Perspectives. Because of the expense of the iPRES conference (and its location in Switzerland), all of the group members were from relatively large and well-resourced institutions. The perspective of under-resourced institutions is very often left out of open-source development communities, as they are unable to support and contribute to such projects; in this case, this design guide would greatly benefit from the perspective of such institutions as to how FOSS tools can be developed to better serve their digital preservation needs. The group was also largely from North America and Europe, so this work would eventually benefit greatly from adding perspectives from the FOSS and digital preservation communities in South America, Asia, and Africa.

Institutional Home and Stewardship. When finalized, the FOSS development requirements list should live somewhere permanently and develop based on the ongoing needs of our community. As this line of communication between practitioners and tool developers is key to the continual development of better and more user-friendly digital preservation tools, we should continue to build on the work of this group.

Referenced FOSS Tool and Community Guides

____

heidi-elaine-kellyHeidi Elaine Kelly is the Digital Preservation Librarian at Indiana University, where she is responsible for building out the infrastructure to support long-term sustainability of digital content. Previously she was a DiXiT fellow at Huygens ING and an NDSR fellow at the Library of Congress.

Building Bridges and Filling Gaps: OSS4Pres 2.0 at iPRES 2016

By Heidi Elaine Kelly and Shira Peltzman

____

This is the first post in a bloggERS series describing outcomes of the #OSS4Pres 2.0 workshop at iPRES 2016.

Organized by Sam Meister (Educopia), Shira Peltzman (UCLA), Carl Wilson (Open Preservation Foundation), and Heidi Kelly (Indiana University), OSS4PRES 2.0 was a half-day workshop that took place during the 13th annual iPRES 2016 conference in Bern, Switzerland. The workshop aimed to bring together digital preservation practitioners, developers, and administrators in order to discuss the role of open source software (OSS) tools in the field.

Although several months have passed since the workshop wrapped up, we are sharing this information now in an effort to raise awareness of the excellent work completed during this event, to continue the important discussion that took place, and to hopefully broaden involvement in some of the projects that developed. First, however, a bit of background: The initial OSS4PRES workshop was held at iPRES 2015. Attended by over 90 digital preservation professionals from all areas of the open source community, individuals reported on specific issues related to open source tools, which were followed by small group discussions about the opportunities, challenges, and gaps that they observed. The energy from this initial workshop led to both the proposal of a second workshop, as well as a report that was published in Code4Lib Journal, OSS4EVA: Using Open-Source Tools to Fulfill Digital Preservation Requirements.

The overarching goal for the 2016 workshop was to build bridges and fill gaps within the open source community at large. In order to facilitate a focused and productive discussion, OSS4PRES 2.0 was organized into three groups, each of which was led by one of the workshop’s organizers. Additionally, Shira Peltzman floated between groups to minimize overlap and ensure that each group remained on task. In addition to maximizing our output, one of the benefits of splitting up into groups was that each group was able to focus on disparate but complementary aspects of the open source community.

Develop user stories for existing tools (group leader: Carl Wilson)

Carl’s group was comprised principally of digital preservation practitioners. The group scrutinized existing pain points associated with the day-to-day management of digital material, identified tools that had not yet been built that were needed by the open source community, and began to fill this gap by drafting functional requirements for these tools.

Define requirements for online communities to share information about local digital curation and preservation workflows (group leader: Sam Meister)

With an aim to strengthen the overall infrastructure around open source tools in digital preservation, Sam’s group focused on the larger picture by addressing the needs of the open source community at large. The group drafted a list of requirements for an online community space for sharing workflows, tool integrations, and implementation experiences, to facilitate connections between disparate groups, individuals, and organizations that use and rely upon open source tools.

Define requirements for new tools (group leader: Heidi Kelly)

Heidi’s group looked at how the development of open source digital preservation tools could be improved by implementing a set of minimal requirements to make them more user-friendly. Since a list of these requirements specifically for the preservation community had not existed previously, this list both fills a gap and facilitates the building of bridges, by enabling developers to create tools that are easier to use, implement, and contribute to.

Ultimately OSS4PRES 2.0 was an effort to make the open source community more open and diverse, and in the coming weeks we will highlight what each group managed to accomplish towards that end. The blog posts will provide an in-depth summary of the work completed both during and since the event took place, as well as a summary of next steps and potential project outcomes. Stay tuned!

____

peltzman_140902_6761_barnettShira Peltzman is the Digital Archivist for the UCLA Library where she leads the development of a sustainable preservation program for born-digital material. Shira received her M.A. in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and was a member of the inaugural class of the National Digital Stewardship Residency in New York (NDSR-NY).

heidi-elaine-kellyHeidi Elaine Kelly is the Digital Preservation Librarian at Indiana University, where she is responsible for building out the infrastructure to support long-term sustainability of digital content. Previously she was a DiXiT fellow at Huygens ING and an NDSR fellow at the Library of Congress.

Practical Digital Preservation: In-House Solutions to Digital Preservation for Small Institutions

By Tyler McNally

This post is the tenth post in our series on processing digital materials.

Many archives don’t have the resources to install software or subscribe to a service such as Archivematica, but still have a mandate to collect and preserve born-digital records. Below is a digital-preservation workflow created by Tyler McNally at the University of Manitoba. If you have a similar workflow at your institution, include it in the comments. 

———

Recently I completed an internship at the University of Manitoba’s College of Medicine Archives, working with Medical Archivist Jordan Bass. A large part of my work during this internship dealt with building digital infrastructure for the archive to utilize in working on digital preservation. As a small operation, the archive does not have the resources to really pursue any kind of paid or difficult to use system.

Originally, our plan was to use the open-source, self-install version of Archivematica, but certain issues that cropped up made this impossible, considering the resources we had at hand. We decided that we would simply make our own digital-preservation workflow, using open-source and free software to convert our files for preservation and access, check for viruses, and create checksums—not every service that Archivematica offers, but enough to get our files stored safely. I thought other institutions of similar size and means might find the process I developed useful in thinking about their own needs and capabilities.

Continue reading