OSS4Pres 2.0: Design Requirements for Better Open Source Tools

By Heidi Elaine Kelly

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This is the second post in the bloggERS series describing outcomes of the #OSS4Pres 2.0 workshop at iPRES 2016, addressing open source tool and software development for digital preservation. This post outlines the work of the group tasked with “drafting a design guide and requirements for Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) tools, to ensure that they integrate easily with digital preservation institutional systems and processes.” 

The FOSS Development Requirements Group set out to create a design guide for FOSS tools to ensure easier adoption of open-source tools by the digital preservation community, including their integration with common end-to-end software and tools supporting digital preservation and access that are now in use by that community. 

The group included representatives of large digital preservation and access projects such as Fedora and Archivematica, as well as tool developers and practitioners, ensuring a range of perspectives were represented. The group’s initial discussion led to the creation of a list of minimum necessary requirements for developing open source tools for digital preservation, based on similar examples from the Open Preservation Foundation (OPF) and from other fields. Below is the draft list that the group came up with, followed by some intended future steps. We welcome feedback or additions to the list, as well as suggestions for where such a list might be hosted long term.

Minimum Necessary Requirements for FOSS Digital Preservation Tool Development

Necessities

  • Provide publicly accessible documentation and an issue tracker
  • Have a documented process for how people can contribute to development, report bugs, and suggest new documentation
  • Every tool should do the smallest possible task really well; if you are developing an end-to-end system, develop it in a modular way in keeping with this principle
  • Follow established standards and practices for development and use of the tool
  • Keep documentation up-to-date and versioned
  • Follow test-driven development philosophy
  • Don’t develop a tool without use cases, and stakeholders willing to validate those use cases
  • Use an open and permissive software license to allow for integrations and broader use

Recommendations

  • Have a mailing list, Slack or IRC channel, or other means for community interaction
  • Establish community guidelines
  • Provide a well-documented mechanism for integration with other tools/systems in different languages
  • Provide functionality of tool as a library, separating out the GUI and the actual functions
  • Package tool in an easy-to-use way; the more broadly you want the tool to be used, package it for different operating systems
  • Use a packaging format that supports any dependencies
  • Provide examples of functionality for potential users
  • Consider the organizational home or archive for the tool for long-term sustainability; develop your tool based on potential organizations’ guidelines
  • Consider providing a mechanism for internationalization of your tool (this is a broader community need as well, to identify the tools that exist and to incentivize this)

Premise

  • Digital preservation is an operating system-agnostic field

Next Steps

Feedback and Perspectives. Because of the expense of the iPRES conference (and its location in Switzerland), all of the group members were from relatively large and well-resourced institutions. The perspective of under-resourced institutions is very often left out of open-source development communities, as they are unable to support and contribute to such projects; in this case, this design guide would greatly benefit from the perspective of such institutions as to how FOSS tools can be developed to better serve their digital preservation needs. The group was also largely from North America and Europe, so this work would eventually benefit greatly from adding perspectives from the FOSS and digital preservation communities in South America, Asia, and Africa.

Institutional Home and Stewardship. When finalized, the FOSS development requirements list should live somewhere permanently and develop based on the ongoing needs of our community. As this line of communication between practitioners and tool developers is key to the continual development of better and more user-friendly digital preservation tools, we should continue to build on the work of this group.

Referenced FOSS Tool and Community Guides

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heidi-elaine-kellyHeidi Elaine Kelly is the Digital Preservation Librarian at Indiana University, where she is responsible for building out the infrastructure to support long-term sustainability of digital content. Previously she was a DiXiT fellow at Huygens ING and an NDSR fellow at the Library of Congress.

Building Bridges and Filling Gaps: OSS4Pres 2.0 at iPRES 2016

By Heidi Elaine Kelly and Shira Peltzman

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This is the first post in a bloggERS series describing outcomes of the #OSS4Pres 2.0 workshop at iPRES 2016.

Organized by Sam Meister (Educopia), Shira Peltzman (UCLA), Carl Wilson (Open Preservation Foundation), and Heidi Kelly (Indiana University), OSS4PRES 2.0 was a half-day workshop that took place during the 13th annual iPRES 2016 conference in Bern, Switzerland. The workshop aimed to bring together digital preservation practitioners, developers, and administrators in order to discuss the role of open source software (OSS) tools in the field.

Although several months have passed since the workshop wrapped up, we are sharing this information now in an effort to raise awareness of the excellent work completed during this event, to continue the important discussion that took place, and to hopefully broaden involvement in some of the projects that developed. First, however, a bit of background: The initial OSS4PRES workshop was held at iPRES 2015. Attended by over 90 digital preservation professionals from all areas of the open source community, individuals reported on specific issues related to open source tools, which were followed by small group discussions about the opportunities, challenges, and gaps that they observed. The energy from this initial workshop led to both the proposal of a second workshop, as well as a report that was published in Code4Lib Journal, OSS4EVA: Using Open-Source Tools to Fulfill Digital Preservation Requirements.

The overarching goal for the 2016 workshop was to build bridges and fill gaps within the open source community at large. In order to facilitate a focused and productive discussion, OSS4PRES 2.0 was organized into three groups, each of which was led by one of the workshop’s organizers. Additionally, Shira Peltzman floated between groups to minimize overlap and ensure that each group remained on task. In addition to maximizing our output, one of the benefits of splitting up into groups was that each group was able to focus on disparate but complementary aspects of the open source community.

Develop user stories for existing tools (group leader: Carl Wilson)

Carl’s group was comprised principally of digital preservation practitioners. The group scrutinized existing pain points associated with the day-to-day management of digital material, identified tools that had not yet been built that were needed by the open source community, and began to fill this gap by drafting functional requirements for these tools.

Define requirements for online communities to share information about local digital curation and preservation workflows (group leader: Sam Meister)

With an aim to strengthen the overall infrastructure around open source tools in digital preservation, Sam’s group focused on the larger picture by addressing the needs of the open source community at large. The group drafted a list of requirements for an online community space for sharing workflows, tool integrations, and implementation experiences, to facilitate connections between disparate groups, individuals, and organizations that use and rely upon open source tools.

Define requirements for new tools (group leader: Heidi Kelly)

Heidi’s group looked at how the development of open source digital preservation tools could be improved by implementing a set of minimal requirements to make them more user-friendly. Since a list of these requirements specifically for the preservation community had not existed previously, this list both fills a gap and facilitates the building of bridges, by enabling developers to create tools that are easier to use, implement, and contribute to.

Ultimately OSS4PRES 2.0 was an effort to make the open source community more open and diverse, and in the coming weeks we will highlight what each group managed to accomplish towards that end. The blog posts will provide an in-depth summary of the work completed both during and since the event took place, as well as a summary of next steps and potential project outcomes. Stay tuned!

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peltzman_140902_6761_barnettShira Peltzman is the Digital Archivist for the UCLA Library where she leads the development of a sustainable preservation program for born-digital material. Shira received her M.A. in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and was a member of the inaugural class of the National Digital Stewardship Residency in New York (NDSR-NY).

heidi-elaine-kellyHeidi Elaine Kelly is the Digital Preservation Librarian at Indiana University, where she is responsible for building out the infrastructure to support long-term sustainability of digital content. Previously she was a DiXiT fellow at Huygens ING and an NDSR fellow at the Library of Congress.

Practical Digital Preservation: In-House Solutions to Digital Preservation for Small Institutions

By Tyler McNally

This post is the tenth post in our series on processing digital materials.

Many archives don’t have the resources to install software or subscribe to a service such as Archivematica, but still have a mandate to collect and preserve born-digital records. Below is a digital-preservation workflow created by Tyler McNally at the University of Manitoba. If you have a similar workflow at your institution, include it in the comments. 

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Recently I completed an internship at the University of Manitoba’s College of Medicine Archives, working with Medical Archivist Jordan Bass. A large part of my work during this internship dealt with building digital infrastructure for the archive to utilize in working on digital preservation. As a small operation, the archive does not have the resources to really pursue any kind of paid or difficult to use system.

Originally, our plan was to use the open-source, self-install version of Archivematica, but certain issues that cropped up made this impossible, considering the resources we had at hand. We decided that we would simply make our own digital-preservation workflow, using open-source and free software to convert our files for preservation and access, check for viruses, and create checksums—not every service that Archivematica offers, but enough to get our files stored safely. I thought other institutions of similar size and means might find the process I developed useful in thinking about their own needs and capabilities.

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