Recent Changes in How Stanford University Libraries is Documenting Born-Digital Processing

By Michael G. Olson

This post is the third in our Spring 2016 series on processing digital materials.

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Stanford University Libraries is in the process of changing how it documents its digital processing activities and records lab statistics. This is our third iteration of how we track our born-digital work in six years and is a collaborative effort between Digital Library Systems and Services, our Digital Archivist Peter Chan, and Glynn Edwards, who manages our Born-Digital Program and is the Director of the ePADD project.

Initially we documented our statistics using a library-hosted FileMaker Pro database. In this initial iteration we were focused on tracking media counts and media failure rates. After a single year of using the database we decided that we needed to modify the data structure and the data entry templates significantly. Our staff found the database too time consuming and cumbersome to modify.

We decided to simplify and replaced the database with a spreadsheet stored with our collection data. Our digital archivist and hourly lab employees were responsible for updating this spreadsheet when they had finished working with a collection. This was a simple solution that was easy to edit and update, and it worked well for four years until we realized we needed more data for our fiscal year-end reports. As our born-digital program has grown and matured, we discovered we were missing key data points that documented important processing decisions in our workflows. It was time to again improve how we documented our work.

BDFL_labstats_FY2015Q1-Q2_v2Stanford Statistics Spreadsheet version 2

For our brand new version of work tracking we have decided to continue to use a spreadsheet but have migrated our data to Google Drive to better facilitate updates and versioning of our documentation. New data points have been included to better track specific types of born-digital content like email. This new version also allows us to better document the processing lifecycle of our born-digital collections. In order to better do this we have created the following additional data points:

  • Number of email messages
  • Email in ePADD.stanford.edu
  • File count in media cart
  • File size on media cart (GB)
  • SearchWorks (materials discoverable / available in library catalog)
  • SpotLight Exhibit (a virtual exhibit)

BDFL_stats_v3Stanford Statistics Spreadsheet version 3

We anticipate that evolving library administrative needs, the continually changing nature of born-digital data, and new methodologies for processing these materials will make it necessary to again change how we document our work. Our solution is not perfect but is flexible enough to allow us to reimagine our documentation strategy in a few short years. If anyone is interested in learning more about what we are documenting and why, please do let us know, as we would be happy to provide further information and may learn something from our colleagues in the process.

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Michael G. Olson is the Service Manager for the Born-Digital / Forensics Labs at Stanford University Libraries. In this capacity he is responsible for working with library stakeholders to develop services for acquiring, preserving and accessing born-digital library materials. Michael holds a Masters in Philosophy in History and Computing from the University of Glasgow. He can be reached at mgolson [at] Stanford [dot] edu.

Digital Processing at the Rockefeller Archive Center

By Bonnie Gordon

This is the first post in our Spring 2016 series on processing digital materials, exploring how archivists conceive of, implement, and track activities to arrange and describe digital materials in archival collections. If you are interested in contributing to bloggERS!, check out our guidelines for writers or contact us at ers.mailer.blog@gmail.com

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At the Rockefeller Archive Center, we’re working to get “digital processing” out of the hands of “digital” archivists and into the realm of “regular” archivists. We are using “digital processing” to mean description, arrangement, and initial preservation of born digital archival content stored on removable storage media. Our definition will likely expand over time, as we start to receive more born digital materials via network transfer and fewer acquisitions of floppy disks and CDs.

The vast majority of our born digital materials are on removable storage media and currently inaccessible to our researchers, donors, and staff. We have content on over 3,000 digital storage media items, which are rapidly deteriorating. Our backlog of digital media items includes over 2,500 optical disks, almost 200 3.5″ floppy disks, and almost 100 5.25″ floppy disks. There are also a handful of USB flash drives, hard drives, and older and unusual media (Bernoulli disks, Sy-Quest cartridges, 8″ floppy disks). This is a lot of work for one digital archivist! Having multiple “regular” archivists process these materials distributes the work, which means we can get through the backlog much more quickly. Additionally, integrating digital processing into regular processing work will prevent a future backlog from being created.

In order to help our processing archivists establish and enhance intellectual control of our born digital holdings, I’m working to provide them with the tools, workflows, and competencies needed to process digital materials.  Over the next several months, a core group of processing archivists will be trained and provided with documentation on digital media inventorying, digital forensics, and other born digital workflows. After training, archivists will be able to use the skills they gained in their “normal” processing projects. The core group of archivists trained on dealing with born digital materials will then be able to train other archivists. This will help digital processing be perceived as just another aspect of “regular” processing. Additionally, providing good workflow documentation gives our processing archivists the tools and competencies to do their jobs.

Streamlining our digital processing workflows is also a really important part of this. One step in this direction is to create a digital media inventory and disk imaging log that will be able to “talk” to our collections management system (ArchivesSpace). We currently have an inventory and imaging log, but they’re in a Microsoft Access database, which has a number of limitations, one of the primary ones being that it can’t integrate with our other systems. Integrating with ArchivesSpace reduces duplicate data entry, inconsistent data, and further integrates digital processing into our “regular” processing work.

The RAC’s processing archivists establish and enhance intellectual and physical control of our archival holdings, regardless of format, in order to facilitate user access. By fully integrating digital processing into “normal” processing activities, we will be able to preserve and provide access to unique born digital content stored on obsolete and decaying media.

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Bonnie Gordon is an Assistant Digital Archivist at the Rockefeller Archive Center, where she works primarily with born digital materials and digital preservation workflows. She received her M.A. in Archives and Public History, with a concentration in Archives, from New York University.